Sharing a budget with my partner

Hi

new on YNAB. I would love to learn How to share a budget with my partner. Anyone who can help?

Thanks!

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  • Hi Cyan Song !

    Sorry for the late response!

    To share your budget with your partner, you'll want to share your login credentials. As long as you're both logging in to the same account, you'll both have access to the budgets you've created and can make real-time changes! :)

    If you have a moment, take a look at our Join Forces Guide for a few tips and tricks on budgeting with a partner!

    Reply Like 2
  • I just upgraded from YNAB Classic after using it for years, not a deal breaker, but sharing login info seems to be a very lame non-elegant way of sharing. Adding such a simple thing seems like it could really extend the use of YNAB, like if your using it for a small business you could share to an accountant and specify read only permissions. Unless you guys are withholding that for a full business product. 

    Reply Like 9
    • Hi DrYou !

      Currently, YNAB is intended to be a household product - meaning users within a household should use the same account. While it's possible to create a separate business budget in that same account, we suggest only members of your household having access.

      If you intend to share with a third party, we'd suggest either exporting your budget for the third party to view that information or maintain a separate YNAB account just for business purposes. I'll pass along your idea for a full business product to our development team for further consideration! :)

      Reply Like
      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 1 yr ago
      • 20
      • Reported - view

      Faness I've been saying this since pre-launch over two years ago... User Access Control.

      The budget owner must have an active subscription, but can give Admin settings, Read, Write permissions to other registered users. Add in the ability to transfer a budget between users (like when a kid moves out and needs to own their budget).

      I mean really, it's pretty basic account permissions stuff.

      Reply Like 20
    • nolesrule Thanks for weighing in! I'll pass this along as well! Having details for our development team to consider is a great help! :)

      Reply Like 3
    • nolesrule Second this.  It really needs to be a priority.

      Reply Like
  • I really like nolesrule 's suggestion -- it would be nice to be able to give my teens access to see the budget, look at it and learn without giving them the power to break things and/or adjust the video game allowance when I'm not looking.  :-P

    Reply Like 8
    • Erin or my husband... who might change our budget for wine;)

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    • Erin Have you considered sitting down and talking with them about it as an alternative. They probably don’t need to see it day in and day out, but explaining it to them and reviewing it with them might suffice until they have their own incoming and expenses. 

      Reply Like
  • I just activated my subscription after being a ynab 4 customer and the first thing I looked for was how to share the budget with my wife so she can check it when she's out shopping. To be clear, sharing login credentials is *not* the same as "sharing a budget". Having a read-only budget view that I can send over to her so she can see at a glance what's left in her Homegoods budget for the month feels like a missing feature as opposed to a bonus feature.

     

    I see above this is meant for "households", but that still implies multiple users, which by every definition I'm aware of means multiple users under a single account (ie, not sharing a single login).

    Reply Like 6
  • This is a major missing feature from the new YNAB. With YNAB 4, I could have my 3 or 4 budgets, and my partner could have her 3 or 4 budgets, and we could share one of them through Dropbox.

    Now with new YNAB, I want to share just one of my 4 budgets with my partner (i.e. our joint budget), but not give him access to all of my budgets (personal, business, etc). He has a a paid account, I have a paid account. We really should be able to share a single budget without sharing login credentials (and thus ALL of our budgets).

    Reply Like 6
  •   Hey  Faness  I agree with all the other voices above... It would be a HUGE help and would really make me feel that the money YNAB costs is worth it if both my wife and I were able to have separate logins that go to the same YNAB subscription/account. In real life, partners and family members share budgets but often have individual credit cards and bank accounts in addition to shared accounts, and it would be great to have my budgeting software reflect this. Please add this function ASAP!

    Reply Like 5
    • Hi Sam Aaron !

      I completely understand and I appreciate you weighing in here! A YNAB subscription is meant to be a household subscription. I used to think of this as a "If you don't trust them with your password, they should probably have their own account", but I've been swayed by all of the cases brought up in the forum!

      I can't make any promises, but I can say this has been brought up with our development team and they've discussed some alternatives. :)

      Reply Like 4
    • Faness I'm glad you're being swayed by the cases brought up in this forum. Budgets are definitely not just for households. I've got four budgets and I want to share three of them with three different people (business partner, non-household co-parent, household partner). Sharing a login would not make sense. Hope this features is added soon.

      Reply Like 4
    • Faness  This is great to hear!

      Reply Like 1
    • Faness Has there been any progress on this in the last 6 months?

      Reply Like 2
    • Hi Cadet Blue Nomad !

      There hasn't been any movement on this option yet. While it has been brought up, there are a number of details that haven't been addressed or ironed out. I can't say for certain, but this issue isn't on our What’s Up Next list so it most likely won't be an option in the near future.

      Reply Like
    • Faness Is there a process for getting things on this What's Up Next list that works?
      I've seen a number of issues being requested by a lot of people and the development team instead comes up with emoji's or something that's not exactly a functional benefit.
      Is there an opportunity for the community to vote up/down upcoming features or is this a closed doors process?

      Reply Like
    • Cadet Blue Nomad Submitting a Feature Request is the best way to make your opinions known. That information goes directly to our development team and is then coded for future analysis. The What's Up Next list is created using that information. 

      Reply Like 1
    • Faness done.  Wish me luck.

      Reply Like
      • Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cadet Blue Nomad I think we just have to keep submitting the same idea, but from different users. 

      Reply Like
    • Faness Any news on this? I just submitted a feature request to. My partner and I have been looking at using YNAB for our budgeting, but not having this kind of a feature is a deal breaker for us. We want to have a joint budget for the things that we pay for together, but we also want to keep separate individual budgets for anything above and beyond that.

      Reply Like
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Adam Liter You can have multiple budgets. It's just that you can't hide them from your other authorized people on your account. If you need that kind of separation, you need multiple accounts.

      Reply Like
      • Til Debt Do Us Part
      • Divorcing Debt - Not Each Other
      • debt_do_us_part
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Adam Liter This is exactly what I currently do. My husband and I have His, Hers and Ours budgets. One for me, one for him and one for our joint accounts and expenses. I dont care if he looks at my budget and vice versa, though it's rare we have a need or reason to.

      Reply Like
    • Til Debt Do Us Part and @bevocat Thanks for the suggestions. We're not concerned about being able to see one another's budgets. Neither of us mind either, but we'd nonetheless like to keep our own budgets separate. Your suggestion of one account but multiple budgets might work for us, but then how do you handle which financial accounts are tied to which budget? Do you have joint accounts for the "Ours" budget, and do you only spend out of those accounts for joint expenses? I think this is something we'd prefer not to do because of (i) credit card rewards and (ii) whether something is a joint expense for us can be an evolving thing, so if we purchased it with a personal account but later decide it should have been a joint expense, it becomes a headache to track, if I correctly understand how this would work.

      Reply Like
      • Til Debt Do Us Part
      • Divorcing Debt - Not Each Other
      • debt_do_us_part
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Adam Liter We paired our credit cards according to what we use them for. Our Amex gets 6% back on groceries, it's a joint account and in our joint budget for grocery spending. If I buy something and decide it's a shared expense, husband transfers the money to my account. It shows in his budget like he bought half of whatever the expense was and I'm reimbursed for his half in my budget. It's easier than it sounds.

      Reply Like
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Adam Liter Sorry I don't have any advice to offer on the details of the mechanics. I don't use the feature myself; I just knew of its existence.

      Reply Like
  • Glad to see acion on this.  This is sorely needed.

    Reply Like 1
  •   Faness I'm on the trial version, evaluating this for my clients as a money coach/blogger. Asking folks to share a login is a show-stopper for me, for all the reasons mentioned (sloppy security, unwanted or unintended changes which are *bad* for marital bliss, etc).  Read-only flags are critical, especially for kids or other household members. Please let me know when this important change is in place!

    Reply Like 3
    • Hi Diver4242 !

      We recently launched a Google Single Sign On option which allows users to link a second email address to their account. That might not be exactly what you're looking for, so you can send any feedback directly to our development team by submitting a Feature Request. :)

      Reply Like
    • Faness Linking a second email address to an account is a tiny step, but it doesn't solve the problem for people who want different users to have different levels of access to various budgets. Again, this feature did exist in the old YNAB.

      Reply Like 1
    • Hi Coral Wildebeest !

      This feature was able to exist in YNAB 4 because it wasn't a cloud based program. Since the file had to be manually adjusted, that file could be made available in different areas (usually through Dropbox). There's no physical file to alter in the web based version of YNAB which makes things a little trickier.

      You can share any ideas you have directly with our development team by submitting a Feature Request.

      Reply Like
    • Faness I hate to bring up your competitors, but this is a tool that Quickbooks and Quicken have each incorporated for a number of years. You can create multiple user accounts, including different types, such as administrator, accountant, read-only, etc. And this, they do in the cloud. So to say that it can't be done because your new version is in the cloud is not completely fair. 

      Reply Like 1
    • Cadet Blue Saxophone I never meant to insinuate it can't be done, just that it's a tricky thing to accomplish - not only because of cloud-based access, but also determining the approach to take. As you mentioned, Quicken has account types. If we decided to follow that method, our development team would need to build in those access limitations for each type. We also have to determine how to maintain a household subscription that can be shared outside of the household. I understand your point, it's just the details we have to get ironed out and then execution. :)

      You can let our development team know what you'd prefer to see by filling out the form linked above! 

      Reply Like
      • prindle175
      • prindle175
      • 10 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Faness It's all about the money

      Reply Like
  • I agree with the need for multiple user accounts. I personally use YNAB, and a single account works for me.  However, I am a conservator for my son, and want to get him up on YNAB. However, I need to have oversight and access to his account for legal reasons.  Also, for such reasons, I do not want to have a single login id.  This is a clear need... PLEASE PRIORITIZE!  

     

    ps.  I did submit a feature request as well.

    Reply Like 3
  • Hi - Can we atleast have separate Budget Books password protected  to open within one subscription account??? That way we could share the passwords to the common budget portfolio but have private budgets within the same account opening with passwords known to the individuals concerned.  ie between Spouses, Parent and Child, Partners etc This is critical and urgently required.  Very disappointed that YNAB team are deflecting this question and requirement .......

    Reply Like 2
  • Sharing passwords with people is a bad security practice. For something that has my banking info and other very private things, you should not be recommending users share their passwords with other people. Most people are not going to share the password in a secure way, opening up tons of risk. That risk is to the users, and also to you as a company when there are headlines like "my YNAB got hacked!!!" (when really what happened is they shared a password in a non-secure way, but by the time that is determined, the stain is already on YNAB for "getting hacked").

    Reply Like 2
    • Hi Khaki Pony ! You bring up some great points. If you haven't already, would you mind submitting a Feature Request to let our developers know?

      Earlier this year, we launched the ability to sign up, and sign in, to YNAB using Google Single Sign-On (SSO), and link a secondary account. You can find more about that here!

      Reply Like
      • Khaki Pony
      • Khaki_Pony
      • 10 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Nicole at YNAB Oh, I see the SSO thing probably solves this (for people who use google auth). In any case this is something your security champions should be adamantly pushing for so you have a more secure and trusted thing, rather than something you are waiting for some random concerned user to log a Feature Request for.

      Reply Like
    • Khaki Pony They are absolutely looking into it and weighing the options! Google SSO was the most recent addition to this aspect of YNAB—but we're always looking to improve.

      Feature Requests are just one way we track user feedback, as we decide what comes next. Here is our security policy, if you're curious!

      Reply Like
    • Nicole at YNAB This gives them access without a password.
      But it gives them the same access as if they had the password.
      Which is kind of the point about not handing out your password - because it gives them complete access to everything and sometimes you don't want to do that -- especially when they are new and you don't really want someone "playing" with a mature budget until they have some familiarity.

      This overall topic is now ~8 months old based on what I can find on this forum.
      I guess I'm now curious if anyone is actually planning on doing anything about this request.  8 months is a lot of development time.

      Reply Like
      • Beige Mask
      • Beige_Mask.4
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cadet Blue Nomad 

      it feels like they are iterating it the right direction.  First separate access, then individualize permissions.  And the Google SSO is a better security approach to be sure.

      Reply Like
    • Beige Mask They don't have separate access yet.  Well, I guess they do if you use Google SSO but then they have a separate access to everything as Admin.  Might has well give them your password and login credentials for all the good it does you.
      At the very least, they need to have the ability to create a budget that you can show/hide from others as necessary in a household.  I would desperately love my kids to use this, but not have access to all my spending and be able to modify it as they see fit.

      Reply Like
  • Nicole at YNAB Google SSO doesn't help with this issue, as far as I'm concerned. I want to be able to share a single budget with a partner, not ALL of my budgets with a partner. I should be able to edit a Budget's settings and indicate which other YNAB users can access it. I don't want to give my partner access to all of my budgets.

    Reply Like 4
  • It seems that this thread is monitored by YNAB Support people. I'm wondering if maybe there could be some information given on why the decision was to not allow multiple users with their individual log-ins for one account?

    It does seem very strange to market a product as a home budgeting tool (not a student budgetin tool) when we all know there are usually at least two people, and then ask them to share a login. Should't be a problem iff there are identical visibility and usage rights. Are the developers afraid that if they implement that, that that would make people want more and more complex account functions, starting with usage rights, and going on from there to visibility and editing rules? I know that this kind of stuff can get excruciatingly complex very quickly so I would understand their concern, but I'm wondering:  

    Is there something they know about the system they are not telling anyone? Maybe that it is could not withstand that kind of complexity once if was implemented? Are they deflecting any entrance into this kind of complexity to avoid attention on a huge mistake sitting at the bottom of the coding structure that would require rebuilding the whole thing from scratch once we started adding anything mildly more complex to accounts than what we have right now?

    I guess I'm just looking for an explanation I can understand. I just signed up and am concerned about this obvious feature missing. It just raises a big red flag.  It can be that the developers are trying to avoid a coding strategy error from being exposed or developers not getting paid enough to really want to dig into the problem when it is so easy to answer all question from the marketing people with "can't be done". Or is it that the management has been asked multiple times to hire a concepter but they are expecting the developers to do the concept work themselves for the same money?  None of theses explanations seem very encouraging. But what else could it be? 

    Reply Like
    • Hi Magenta Violin !

      To answer this question, I want to start with a bit of history. YNAB started as a computer program (actually, a spreadsheet, and then a computer program). For the desktop version of YNAB, there was no login requirement. It was a desktop program, downloaded to a computer, only accessible from a computer with the program installed. This allowed for Household use. YNAB could be downloaded on the family computer in the living room and accessed, as needed, by any household member with access to that computer. 

      We wanted to keep that same Household approach with the newer version of YNAB. Anyone in a home could potentially log in with the same email address and password, and maintain their own personal budget (since multiple budgets are allowed in the same account). The Google SSO allows for more than one email address to be connected, but it still accesses the same account. Since separate log ins don't change the account itself, sharing a password was a simpler approach.

      That's not to say everyone should be sharing your account. If you're not comfortable sharing your budget with someone, it's probably best they have their own account. My husband and I have a number of shared accounts, and we know the login credentials for those accounts - I trust him to have access to our budget because he knows the inner workings. However, if I wanted to share my budget with someone who wasn't my husband (or other relative in my household), I'd take the information I wanted them to see and send it to them by either exporting my budget, sending screenshots, etc.

      We've learned, as voiced in this thread, that not everyone shares this opinion. Some users want the option to share an account with someone, while keeping their budget private, and we're working on how best to move forward with that in mind. :)

      Reply Like
  • Thanks for the answer. Makes perfect sense, but still....

    it has become customary that everyone has their own key to a house so you don't have to ask someone to lend you their key. It's a bit of a far fetched example, but it kind of demonstrates a truth about human nature that we want our own entry device into a space, even if we share that space with others.

    It's not so much about keeping some rooms locked for others not to be able to enter. I's about being able to enter or exit at your own convenience without feeling like you borrowed someone's identity.

    An email address is something so personal, it feels alien and weird to share it. I don't want anyone to use my personal email address as a login *anywhere*. Even if that person is not able to send emails with it. It feels like you are giving someone your drivers license.

    It feels a bit as if someone has to impersonate me in order to do something. Just like you are impersonating your parents when you log into their computer with their username and password. It makes you feel like a minor. Like someone who hasn't earned the right to their own access. An email address is not something you share. Makes no difference where the software came from originally. The thought of husbands giving their wives their personal email address, the wives then have to use to get into the budgeting software (which probably is the more standard case) even has something cringe-worthy and condescending about it. Makes me think of the middle east and women not having the right to ownership and their own possessions and everything being handled by the man. Makes me think of the sixties and men handing women their allowance for the month. I think someone in this thread even talked about giving the wive non-editable access to the budget so that she can see how much she can spend this month. What on earth could be the reason for not giving another grown up human being full access to YNAB. It's not like she can accidentally launch an atom bomb. Is that woman 17 or why is she not allowed to do basic budget managing?  I am exaggerating here of course, but the login concept walks a bit close to social behaviour models of de-humanising and de-valuing people. Or at least you are not really helping with the concept.

    I would even argue that the approach for one grown up to borrow a highly personal identification piece from another grown up wasn't okay for grown up household users back then, and it isn't not okay for grown up users now. Makes no difference if the software is PC based or web based.  

    And if all of you, the entire development team plus everyone from marketing, plus the occasional freelancing information architect or concepter didn't feel it in their gut that  this is a basic truth about human nature and our culture and tradition and the dynamics in families, it just keeps those red flags coming. 

    It's strange, because this lack of understanding of the human nature when it comes to the concept of account handling is so much in contrast to the way the software is sold with those incredible emails and videos in which we users are talked to face to face, without condescending tones or raised fingers or sarcasm or irony about our lack of ability to manage our finances. Very strange indeed.

    I'm trying to figure you guys out and so far this is the biggest contradictory presence of "the light versus the dark side" being housed inside the same company I can think of seeing in the past years, if ever. Very strange indeed.

    Reply Like
      • Tobias
      • Toviathan
      • 10 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Magenta Violin It's really not as deep as you're making it out to be. You are really reaching if you think a shared sign-on is the same thing as dehumanizing someone. It has nothing to do with control over someone else or trying to take away agency. How many people would anyone want to share a personal budget with? In most households, it is most likely going to be the adults (husband & wife, husband & husband, wife & wife, etc). If you cannot share one password with a significant other, then you have other problems. If you are starting to add in kids, it still shouldn't be a non-starter either. You aren't handing over any information other than what's in your budget. 

      And if you really do value your email address that much, why not just create a new family address that you only use for things like YNAB where you will be sharing the log-on? Gmail is free; it's what I did with my husband for our banking apps and such. That way you aren't giving out your real email address (which doesn't do anything anyway. Unless you are also handing over the password to said email). 

      And no, wanting different access levels is not the same as turning people into sixties-era housewives. There are a lot of perfectly reasonable explanations for wanting it. In my house, for example, my husband leaves most of the budgeting and figuring to me. I have the better head for numbers and money, so he likes it better when we discuss our goals and expectations and then I take care of making it happen. He will use YNAB to make sure there is money in a category he needs to use and then log his transactions, but he doesn't like to touch much else for fear of messing things up. He would love it if we could lock his access down more so he can feel assured that he isn't throwing categories out of whack.

      I think you're trying very hard to find some evil conspiracy where there is none to be found. 

      Reply Like
  • It's not really about a conspiracy. Details matter. The things you do, or don't do matter. If the world wasn't ruled by small details being symbols for something else, marketing wouldn't work. Every brand in the world uses the power of subtle metaphors and symbols because we as humans work this way. "Just do it" by Nike means you can fulfil a dream you've not been able to follow up on up to now. That's pretty subtle yet it ties the product to a behavior, an attitude and an action. Pretty powerful for a simple sentence that actually doesn't mean anything. If that is already working so well, you can see how small details in an interface or a service concept shape perceptions and behaviours. 

    A service that makes you use something that is a personal identifier to lend to another person sends a strong brand message. That's just how the world works. I didn't make it up or pick up metaphors or conspsiracies that aren't there. The connotations are there, but you are choosing to ignore the complexity of the world where other brand or services choose not to. That's pretty much all that it is. You can either make the details of the world work for or against you. In this case, all I wanted to say is that the details you have chosen are working against you, because they are working against how humans function, and how we have evolved into undertanding access rights to digital services, personal rights, and the use of email addresses. 

    If I set a global email for my family that still means I am bending the rules of a system never intended for such a purpose to work with this special interpretation of service access you have chosen to implement. If you ever get an email from an address called "familyjones@gmail.com", you know that someone is speaking "in behalf of" that family. Also an email address functions as a place to send emails to, not as an access. Services of the past years have chosen to replace the previous user name with an email address only because all of us have one and we can remember it more easily reducing cost for those services with fewer dead accounts. The idea should not be to create yet another email address that is kind of like the old user names because it has no other function.  And then again it has another function. Someone has to go and monitor those emails that might go to that created address because once it is out there, emails will be written, even if you specifically created it just as a username. 

    No matter how trivial you think the matter is, the fact that someone has to create a shared email that actually you can't share, in order to use as an entry for several people into a service is just thinking around at least a dozen of corner instead of thinking in a straight line, and is ignoring a bunch of not so insignificant usability and behavioural problems that it is creating. 

    And again, it just raises red flags if a concept as simple as a personal access is over complicated to such a degree that you are "mis"-using other services, like email addresses in general, or having to create additional addresses in another service by an independent company just to be able to properly use yours. 

    I think we all have better things to do than to discuss these things here. I just wanted to respond one last time because using the word "conspiracy" is actually not acceptable and I am really quite concerned that you would go so far as to call someone who is simply pointing out the usability problems with your concept as someone who is politically motivated or is somewhat "extreme". 

    There is nothing extreme about what I said. All these connotations are in your concept. You can accept that they are there and rework your concept so it is connotation-free, or you can ignore it, but you can't make someone who is just pointing out the facts out as an extremist or "weird thinker".  Well, actually you did. Bit it sure is not very nice. Detailed thinking is necessary to build quality products that function precisely. It' the kind of thinking you find with architects and all professionals who fix things so that they work properly. We are not conspiracy people. We are people finding problems in systems so that they can be eliminated and the system can work better.  

    I'm not going to respond any more to this, obviously, as you have chosen to get personal, which is very unfortunate. So this his hopefully something someone with a more neutral, detail and quality oriented mindset can one day dig up, if needed, once you are starting to rework the current service access concept. My bet would be that you have to pretty soon. Because actually your concept is the "extreme" thing here, that one immediately rubs against because it is so unusal and uncommon and unfortunate.  Its simply not up to date in a whole lot of areas, most of which I mentioned, ranging from ignoring web standards to more subtle psychological connotations. But as they say, people always accuse others of what they are doing themselves. 

    I still like the service and am looking forward to using it but this exchange has shown me that your focus is not so much on detail and quality. And I guess it doesn't have to be. It's not a real banking software or one that manages city traffic. It doesn't have to have that kind of attention to detail. I hoped it would have it, but I guess you can't have it all. Thanks for the glimpse behind the curtain. 

    Reply Like
  • I suspect the real reason this hasn't been implimented is they are afraid that itll be used to get free ynab access like someone might ask their friend who had a password subscription to create a new budget for them and share it with them. 

    Now i think the best way around that is to put limits on how many users can share or maybe even how many budgets an account can have?  Just since is then you could even offer various levels of account more budgets and or users would require a slightly higher account level.  I think this should solve that problem.  Then you can offer different levels.

    1) Administrator full access including controlling users

    2) Budgeter/Write access can make any changes to the budget

    3) Spender access can create transactions or edit their own transactions.

    4) Readonly access for kids or maybe an accountant?  These users shouldn't count towards any user limits on an account if they are only readinly on every budget they have access to.

    5) No access. They can't even read the budget or see that it exists in the account.

    Seperately from these per budget permissions would be an Account Owner, has access to billing info, creating budgets, ect.

    Reply Like 2
    • Coral Battery That's pretty complicated.  I'd be happy if I could tag a budget as read or read/write to another login identity.  You've set it up as a rather complicated bureaucracy.  I don't have that many people in my house.  

      Reply Like
      • Beige Mask
      • Beige_Mask.4
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Cadet Blue Nomad 

      I would be happy with Full Access or No Access on a per budget basis.  Honking as a programmer, that seems MUCH easier than fine tuning pieces of the interface to be read only.

      Reply Like 1
    • Beige Mask It would be the first step.  Read-only would also be trivial as this entire system is based on a rather good database.

      Reply Like
  • Well said Coral Battery.  I think that you are spot on in the true rationale for not adding this feature - they are trying to not get Netflixed out potential paid accounts.  All of the other dancing around the issue is disingenuous.  However, in this effort to gain paid users, YNAB is putting their current user base at risk.  My wife and I both have YNAB4 - she actually turned me onto it - but we are both balking at the upgrade to the online version because we can't share our joint budget. We each want to have our own private individual budgets in a joint budget with equal access rights. That really does not seem like too much to ask for $75 a year...  

    Reply Like 1
    • Aquamarine Banjo Netflix earned over $500 million last year.  I don't think this is the same.
      Not knowing what YNAB does make, I'm willing to guess they don't have a net earnings of this magnitude and could benefit more by focusing on adoption of the product rather than maximizing returns for their stock holders.
      Even so, Netflix and others still allows multiple devices to connect and they are still able to make this much in a year.  Not sure how big of a problem this really is.

      Reply Like
  • I'm just making this transition from YNAB4, and have been happy with the support and responsiveness so far.  It sounds like I don't have a new request, but I'd love to be able to create a simple budget with my 15 year old, to help her manager her babysitting money, and maybe even let her handle some of her typical expenses (clothes and such) herself.  It doesn't look like I'll be able to give her her own kids account (and free student for 1 year doesn't get us through the college years).  So, I think I'll get her rolling with YNAB4 for now.  It should be a good experience for her either way.  And I'll just try to keep an eye on feature roll out in case we get a chance to bring her online with us.   Hopefully master account can do anything in any budget is enough of a reason for people to not just be sharing their account with friends.

    Reply Like 1
  • Faness said:
    That's not to say everyone should be sharing your account. If you're not comfortable sharing your budget with someone, it's probably best they have their own account.

    You're talking $336 for a family of four.  Non-starter...

    Not even an option to consider when you might show someone a demo for 34-days but they won't really get engaged for much longer if they are starting from the position of, "why do I even need a budget?" -- typical of most people.

    The ones who will sign up for this on a 34-day trial are the ones who, "I really need a budget but this other stuff doesn't seem to work".  Point being, they have identified a need instead of you are trying to identify the value on the longer term cases, typical with children and young adults. 

    Reply Like
  • I'd like to add my voice to this request. There really needs to be a way to designate some accounts as my, yours, and ours. There are transactions that I wouldn't want my partner to see (like if i'm buying him a gift) . We should be able to have one place to look at and share information, but each partner should be able to chose with information to share. The new app HoneyDue did this really well, but it's too new so it doesn't connect with most accounts so I couldn't use it. This seems to be a big miss for YNAB.

    Reply Like 2
    • Sky Blue Saxophone HoneyDue looks like the right idea.
      I think they would accomplish a lot if they simply had an option to have a limited number of unique people (using something like Google SSO) to access the account, with the owner deciding what each SSO ID can see or not see.  Of course the next option will be to allow for read-only but still limit the accounts to allow a household to develop the habits.

      Reply Like 1
  • I'm willing to admit I am part of the problem here. I share my YNAB account with more people than my household. I honestly don't care if my friend sees my budget in YNAB,  they can't access my accounts or take the money so 🤷‍♀️ 

    But for those who do care, https://familybudgets.online (let's you grant readonly access to your budgets)

    Reply Like 2
      • S-R
      • Salmon_Tugboat.2
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Til Debt Do Us Part  This. Is. Amazing.   😍 It's about time!!!👌  Thankful that there are brilliant people out there who can create extensions like this... Thank you!

      Reply Like 2
    • Til Debt Do Us Part Would you know if this can support a split of budgets where A has read/write to one and read-only to another while B has the reverse?

      Reply Like
    • Til Debt Do Us Part Yes it can and this is a pretty great start to addressing the stodgy development teams problems.

      Reply Like
      • Til Debt Do Us Part
      • Divorcing Debt - Not Each Other
      • debt_do_us_part
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      S-R I'm glad it helps! Just want to be clear I am Not the brilliant mind that came up with it, just wanted to share! 😁

      Reply Like
  • My vision of what would work great for my family would be to emulate exactly the way that 1Password handles this. I pay for a Family subscription which is slightly more than an individual one, and up to 5 household members can have their own logins, and create their own vaults. You can choose to share a vault with any number of other family members and control their read/write/manage access, and there's also a whole family vault everyone has access to.

    This solves the problem of the need for 1 login = 1 identity, as well as privacy concerns, and this is the exact model YNAB needs for me to be able to get my partner contributing to our shared household budget without being able to meddle with my personal budget!

    Reply Like 1
    • Khaki Lobster The difficulty with this kind of feature request is it tends to reduce the immediate cash flow of the company.  They have a 34-day promo but it's hardly enough for most people to really understand how to use it.  But the annual price after that is too much for most of my friends.

      Had they been given access for a longer period of time, they might have gained a higher perceived value but I'm not their business analyst.

      Reply Like
  • Okay, I didn't read a fraction of this, but as a new user I was shocked to see YNAB officially saying "Share your login credentials".

    You should never, never, never, never, never, never share login credentials for anything.  Ever.  If a company encourages the practice, it's a giant, waving, red flag.

    Reply Like 5
      • adriana01
      • adriana01
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Tan Pony if you shared a bank account with a spouse or significant other, do you share your login information so you each have access to a shared resource?

      Reply Like
      • Tan Pony
      • Tan_Pony.3
      • 7 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      adriana01 our bank has separate login accounts, as it should.  Both our login accounts have access to each of our shared checking and savings accounts.  We also each have individual accounts that the other person has no access to.  Again, exactly as it should be.  Mine, hers and ours.

      Reply Like 1
      • adriana01
      • adriana01
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Tan Pony your bank clearly has a more advanced online system than my parent's small-town bank!

      You will want to check out how to set up Google authentication for YNAB:

      https://www.youneedabudget.com/google-single-sign-on-for-ynab-no-password-required/

      Reply Like
      • Tan Pony
      • Tan_Pony.3
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      adriana01 I'm already using Google for authentication. I'm not sure how that helps me. 

      Reply Like
    • Tan Pony I see you posted about this on another thread, and we recommend that if you want to share your budget you connect your accounts via Google: You can connect your individual Google accounts in My Account (https://app.youneedabudget.com/settings).

      Reply Like
      • Tan Pony
      • Tan_Pony.3
      • 7 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Chrissy Okay, I see the "secondary".  That's really a weird workaround but might be acceptable.  Thanks.

      Reply Like
  • This is stupid. Share my credentials? Figure it out our your competitors will. 

    Reply Like 1
    • Gray Wizard 

      If you prefer not to share your YNAB credentials, you can connect your YNAB account to your Google logins in My Account. That way, you can both access YNAB and make real-time changes! :)

      Reply Like
  • Any update on this? I'm currently using the trial version and I really love everything about it but I have a small business and would like to keep that info separate from family members that have access to the budget. Trying to figure out if YNAB is best route to go now with that barrier in mind.

    Reply Like 1
    • Hi Khaki Zebra !

      Currently, there isn't an option to make certain budgets unaccessible when logging into YNAB. Another user in this thread mentioned Family Budgets, an API extension that Works with YNAB so that users can only see or interact with certain budgets, but it doesn't provide the layout or full features of YNAB.

      If you create a separate budget for your business it wouldn't be included in your family budget, but anyone who accesses your YNAB account will have the option of opening the business budget.

      You can submit a Feature Request to our product team for further consideration! :)

      Reply Like
    • Faness Ok thanks for the update

      Reply Like
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