Transferring from one account to another, real life delay not able to reflect in YNAB?

I've made an ACH transfer from one of my checking accounts to another. This process takes 3-5 days in real life. Meanwhile, the money has left account #1 and isn't yet in account #2. However, in YNAB, I can't make it leave account #1 without it looking like its immediately available in account #2. If I try to change the arrival date in account #2, it automatically changes the leaving date in account #1.

How the heck do I get this to reflect appropriately?

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  • You're right - a transfer in YNAB doesn't have a limbo like in real life. If you really want to, and you have a lot of these, and you're relying heavily on accurate running balances for cash-flow decisions, you could create your own limbo account.

    It would look like this:

    Checking A: transfer (-$500) to Limbo on 5/30

    Limbo: transfer (+$500) from Checking A on 5/30

    Limbo: transfer (-$500) to Checking B on 6/2

    Checking B: transfer (+$500) from Limbo on 6/2

    You would only have to enter two transactions (one to Limbo from A/one from Limbo to B), but I detailed what each side would look like above. 

    But... When I do this, I just pick the account where I care more about cash flow and choose the date it will be real in that account. 

    Up to you how simple or complicated you want to be. 馃檪

    Like 3
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life This is a perfect workaround! Thank you! I do these transfers pretty often, so it鈥檚 been frustrating having to keep a mental note of what鈥檚 in limbo and what鈥檚 actually in the two accounts. I鈥檒l definitely use this solution! 

      Like
    • Breanne To add to this: anything you can do to reduce the number of transfers you have to make is going to make your budget so much simpler. It seems like it would be a small thing, but it's not. I know that's not always possible, but if you're wondering whether it's worth changing a direct deposit or a bunch of direct debits to make it happen, it's worth it.

      Like 6
    • Breanne Yeah....I don't know your situation, but it maybe better to consolidate the checking accounts. Or put them in the same bank. I used to have two checking accounts but giving dollars jobs helped me just move it into one. I do have a savings account and that simplified things. 

      Like
  • Why not just leave it uncleared in YNAB till it鈥檚 showing up in the bank?

    Like 2
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Leaving it uncleared doesn鈥檛 solve the problem. Account 1 will have the correct balance, but account 2 still calculates it as working balance even though it鈥檚 not cleared. I don鈥檛 much understand why.

      Like
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 6 mths ago
      • 4
      • Reported - view

      Breanne yes the working balance is higher, but the cleared balance will still be accurate.

      Like 4
      • lindsay_g
      • Beige_Banjo.3
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Breanne Because the working balance is telling you how much you really have. The uncleared funds have been spent. They aren鈥檛 yours any more. It might show in the bank, but they are on the way to the seller. 

      Like
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      lindsay_g What seller? 馃

       

       I understand what working and cleared/uncleared balances are. The problem with transferring money from one account to another is that in real life, the money leaves account A immediately, and it will not be a true working balance in account B until days later when the ACH transfer has processed completely. Yet in YNAB, transferring the money from account A to B has no option to reflect that delay, and account B will immediately calculate the transfer into the working balance. When it鈥檚 not yet there. 

      Like
    • Breanne Could you just set the future date of the transaction? 

      Unfortunately YNAB will not know when the transaction is in the bank until the bank knows it has received the money. There isn't really a way out of just waiting a few days for it to clear or making a limbo account (a staging account for your outflow to sit in until your bank knows it got it).

      Breanne said:
      in real life, the money leaves account A immediately, and it will not be a true working balance in account B until days later

       Also, this is not quite accurate. Your bank for account A still has to process the transaction, most of the time they just consider it as made when you make it. Other banks do not do this and provide an estimate for when it will be sent. 

      YNAB assumes any transactions happen when they happen because the budget is guiding the spending not the balances. 

      Like
      • lindsay_g
      • Beige_Banjo.3
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Breanne Yes sorry, it was late and I was thinking of my own cleared thousands. Which aren鈥檛 mine anymore (although they still show in my account) because they are uncleared. But are transactions.

      It doesn鈥檛 matter if it鈥檚 a purchase or a transfer, money can and does exist - in effect - in two states.

      I鈥檓 unsure, tbh, why this short delay is bothering you so much. The delay exists in real life , you can reflect it in your budget, or not. I live and work abroad, so when I send money home there is a delay of 1-3 days before it appears in my home account. Sometimes I tell YNAB it has cleared (since I鈥檓 budgeting so why not get on with it?). Other times I leave it till it鈥檚 really cleared, 

      In terms of transfers to myself, such as paying a credit card, or student loan, I tell YNAB it鈥檚 clear (even though it isn鈥檛 yet) because the fact I want is where I stand with the company now I鈥檝e made that payment.

      so it depends鈥. But why double the tapping by inventing limbo? I suppose it depends how much screen time you have free. It鈥檚 not for me though. 馃檪

      Like 1
  • As has already been mentioned, (and like they said, perhaps your situation requires 2 accounts, I don't know) But once you get used to the fact that categories, and not accounts, determine what the money is for you can combine your accounts, and transferring between them won't be needed any more.

    But also as has been mentioned, waiting to clear the transaction until it actually hits the account will tell you what is currently available in that account, just by looking at cleared balance.  So if combining accounts isn't an option, at least you can see what your balance is until it clears.

    Like 4
  • Move Light Sound Life said:
    and you're relying heavily on accurate running balances for cash-flow decisions

     Since this thread keeps coming up, I think the operative reason for being interested in a work-around is what I quoted above. 

    It's the running balance, not the cleared balance, that would warrant the extra work.

    For me, any discrepancies in running balances and cash-flow projections due to timing happen on the account side where it doesn't matter, so the cleared balance is as accurate as it needs to be. 

    Now, whether or not the transfers are necessary or account structure will eventually be simplified is up to the OP and their situation.  It's always a little exciting when the time comes to streamline efficiency. However, I completely understand the need to simply grasp reality and hold on with both hands until catching on to the rhythm. 

    Like
    • WordTenor
    • Can we agree that goals are dumb and immature? Sure.
    • WordTenor
    • 6 mths ago
    • 1
    • Reported - view

    ...?

    Cleared transactions are the transactions which matter. Uncleared transactions allow you to keep track of committed monies. 

    That is not a YNAB thing, that's a banking thing. If you're using a bank, do the banking thing. You make a transfer transaction and they are committed but unsettled. When they settle, clear them. Stop making it more complicated than it is.

    Like 1
  • WordTenor said:
    Uncleared transactions allow you to keep track of committed monies. 

     Correct. I was imagining a scenario where a large sum of money was coming into a main checking account from a joint account, and the OP was trying to ensure the running balance wouldn't go negative while waiting for the inflow to actually hit.

    For any other situation, I'd increase the account cushion and/or choose the date of the transfer when it would hit the checking account. Joint finances add a layer of complexity, though that may or may not be the concern here. 

    Like
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 6 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      Spot on. This is a joint finance situation. And since we are in the beginning stages of budgeting and sorting out our finances, I don鈥檛 have the cushion (yet) to brush off the small delay. I need to know exactly what is available in each account, uncleared transactions included, so that I don鈥檛 overdraw our accounts while waiting for a transfer. 
       

      More seasoned YNAB鈥檙s definitely won鈥檛 have this problem and eventually I鈥檒l get there too. In the meantime, I鈥檝e created a limbo account to put pending monies in when it鈥檚 not available to use in either account. Problem (somewhat) solved.

      Like 3
    • Breanne Great! And for the benefit of anyone else who stumbles upon this thread, in YNAB, the running balance is not there to inform spending decisions.

      Like you're saying, it's simply there to help you put the money in the right place at the right time to pay for things without overdrawing.

      In YNAB, there's a two-step process for spending money:

      1. Check the category. Is enough available? 

           A) Yes, go to step two.

           B) No, move money from a lower priority category or forego the purchase.

      2. Check the account you're trying to spend from. Is enough available?

           A) Yes, make purchase.

           B) No, transfer from an account with money.

       

      Just to head off future confusion. 馃槈

      Like 1
      • WordTenor
      • Can we agree that goals are dumb and immature? Sure.
      • WordTenor
      • 5 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life 

      Then  common sense needs to apply. If you need to  use the spending categories to make decisions and there鈥檚 not wiggle room to do that without the money being in place, then the transaction cannot be recorded in YNAB until it is cleared. 

      This is basic money management. You take the most conservative number, which means recording outflows as soon as they happen and inflows when they clear. 

      No need for another account and split transactions. You must apply brain to budget. 

      Like
  • WordTenor said:
    transaction cannot be recorded in YNAB until it is cleared. 

     You surprise me. 

     

    WordTenor said:
    You take the most conservative number, which means recording outflows as soon as they happen and inflows when they clear. 

     Is that not the intention of the OP?

     

    WordTenor said:
    No need for another account and split transactions. You must apply brain to budget. 

     Surely the few extra clicks of the limbo account is at least on par with mentally calculating possible future balances and managing a To-Do of transfers to support financial obligations. Maybe your brain is more well-organized than mine. 馃檪

    Of course, the limbo account is a scaffold to the ideal higher efficiency of a simplified account structure, which is why it's important to give it context. I tend to assume that another, rational adult will search out good practices and continue to improve their situation as they are ready for the next step, whether that's abstractly in YNAB or in their concrete financial life. Joint finances already put things in a kind of limbo anyways - why not represent reality in YNAB instead of pretending they're more simplified than they are?

    I think our habitual educational approaches differ from one another. Since that's appropriate, we may have to agree to disagree. Or we could talk pedagogy. 馃檭

    Like 1
      • Ceeses
      • Ceeses
      • 5 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life Have you forgotten scheduled transactions?

      Instead of entering a transfer, you enter an outflow with the date you initiated the transfer. Then you enter a scheduled inflow for the farthest date you expect the inflow to hit.

      With a limbo account, you either have to also enter 2 transfers. Or you have to find the original transfer and edit the payee. So same amount of work?

      Edit: my emojis don't work... Sad...

      Like
      • WordTenor
      • Can we agree that goals are dumb and immature? Sure.
      • WordTenor
      • 5 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life 

      Yes. The user has to take responsibility for thinking about their own cash flow needs. 

      When I first started using YNAB, I was very close to the bone. My bank would only deposit $100 of any given paper check right away (and I had one job which paid me in paper checks only); it took 24-48 hours to clear the rest. And that small amount of difference mattered, I couldn't afford to pretend I had $60 more than I actually did. So when I deposited my check, I entered a transaction for $100 and when the full check cleared the day later, I would change the amount. That ensured that my account balances and my category balances always reflected the money which was truly available.

      If the transfer matters, materially, to the cash flow of the budget, then the user has to have the common sense to wait until the transfer has cleared on both sides to enter it. That's the user's responsibility as the user. There's no mental calculation--you don't record the transfer at all until it is cleared. That's the conservative method of account balance management. Inflows are recorded when they are cleared, outflows are recorded when they are committed. That way, the account balance always reflects the most conservative possible balance. 

      Like
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 5 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Ceeses This is exactly what I鈥檇 like to do. But in YNAB, you cannot make the outflow date from account A different from the inflow date on account B. When you change the date on either transaction, it automatically changes the date on the other.

      Like
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor But the money IS in account A when I initiate the transfer. All I鈥檓 asking is that when I initiate a transfer from account A to account B, that I can both reflect the removal from account A on the day it鈥檚 initiated, and be able to change the inflow date on account B to a later date, similar to what you鈥檙e describing. However, it鈥檚 not possible. I change the outflow date on account A and it changes the inflow date on Account B to match, and vice versa. Changing the inflow date on account B to a later date makes account A appear as if it still has the money, when it doesn鈥檛.

      This is why the limbo account has become necessary. Obviously if it was fresh income as you are describing, I would just wait for it to hit the account in general. But the money is already there, I鈥檓 just trying to move it and have the account balances reflect accurately. 

      Like 1
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Ceeses I re-read your reply and see you said 鈥渋nstead鈥 of a transfer. But that method would then require creating new categories and fudging with the budget. I don鈥檛 see that as a better alternative, if anything it would be less preferred. 

      Like 1
      • Ceeses
      • Ceeses
      • 5 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Breanne You can't if you enter the transaction as a transfer. Not if you enter the transaction as a transaction. You would need a category for that to remove the funds from your budget for a few days and then put them back.
      But that's would be the same with a limbo account. If you want to consider that money as money you can't currently spend, then it needs to disappear from your budget and not only the accounts. Which means the limbo account would have to be a tracking budget (not a budget account) and would require a category to transfer the money out and then back in.
      Else the money is still in the budget and your budget categories are inflated by this amount of money that you in fact can't currently use for a few days.

      Edit: read your latest reply after posting.

      Like
      • WordTenor
      • Can we agree that goals are dumb and immature? Sure.
      • WordTenor
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Breanne Right. And if that matters, as in, you are likely to screw up the real-world account because the money is not yet in account B, then you have to wait to enter the transfer until both sides of the transaction settle. It's income to account B, even if it's money in your possession in account A.

      If you have enough money in account B, however, it probably doesn't matter. A limbo account is not necessary. Any time you feel compelled to have accounts or transactions in YNAB which don't exist in the real world, you've gone down a bad path. 

      Either it doesn't matter that the accounts are not perfect, in which case, you enter at the get-go and clear when it clears, or it matters that the accounts are not perfect, in which case, you wait until the whole transaction is settled. 

      However, frankly, if you feel you need a limbo account because you need to record the outflow from account A so that account A's balance is conservative, and then wait to record the inflow to account B so that account B's balance is conservative...

      ...you are running on too thin a margin and should just have one account. 

      Like 1
    • WordTenor Normally, I agree with your hard line, but I'm just not getting this. Perhaps I really identify with the need - when I started YNAB, it was because my husband and I were trying to join our finances. We had a whole slew of accounts, since my husband had been budgeting by account previously, and I had been budgeting by spreadsheet previously. Learning to speak the same language about money was as much a process as learning YNAB the software, as much as learning YNAB the method, which was as much a process as actually figuring out our financial decisions. 

      Have we simplified over time? Yes. But were we, as individuals, ready to restructure our financial life at the behest of a budgeting software that kept allowing money to disappear (SFTF)? No. Not right away. 

      Breanne , as you are making strides in your YNAB growth, please consider (and allow to sink in) what is being presented in this link: https://www.youneedabudget.com/the-relationship-between-your-budget-your-accounts-its-complicated/

      It took me a little while to get it (I was also endeavoring to show my husband that I understood his way), but I was thoroughly tired of doing the transfers after about 4 months. It took my husband longer (another 4 months) to wrap his head around separating accounts/categories, and we haven't looked back for over two years. However, our finances are truly joined. I can only imagine the complexity if they were only partially joined.

      I could, *perhaps* see removing the money from the budget, like Ceeses said if your finances are only partially joined.

      However, if you're making spending decisions based on category balances first, I don't see why having a temporary limbo state that ensures accurate running balances would be a problem. 

      I do think this is funny: 

      Ceeses said:
      Have you forgotten scheduled transactions?

       That is the entire reason to be interested in this workaround, IMO. 

      Like
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor ehh. I disagree with all of this. I don鈥檛 think what I鈥檓 asking for is related to good/bad/ideal budgeting scenarios. That鈥檚 all subjective and will vary from person to person. My goal is to emulate real life in YNAB as closely as possible, and this is a feature that should be tweaked to allow for two different dates so that it truly emulates real life.

      Whether one has 2 accounts or 20, that鈥檚 irrelevant. The goal is to progress in your budget and improve your financial life, and that鈥檚 doable regardless of the number of accounts you have. 

      We need to be able to accurately record the money moves we make in the real world, in real time, without workarounds. A bank to bank transfer is far from being unusual, especially between married couples. Foregoing personal checking accounts in exchange for a single joint checking account is, reasonably, not going to happen. 

      Like 1
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life I read the article you shared and yes, I understand completely. I think part of it is me being very particular about everything being accurate, and when I log in to my bank accounts, I want them to match the register in YNAB, perfectly. 

      Like 1
  • Move Light Sound Life said:
    I could, *perhaps* see removing the money from the budget, like Ceeses said if your finances are only partially joined.

     I don't see this. The OP says it is important for them to track the flow of money diligently as they don't have a cushion. So if the money doesn't disappear from the budget during the time the transfer is approved, when they use their categories for spending decisions,  the budget will say they can spend the money but they won't be able to find an account that will allow the spending.

    I know you could say in that case, you just have to delay the spending. But I don't like breaking the agreement between amount of money in accounts (real accounts) and amount of money in the budget. That's the core of YNAB after all. The fact that the situation lasts only a few days has been discussed before, and the OP said it was important for them to have an accurate view of their money during that short time frame.

    Like
    • Ceeses Er... It's really interesting that such seasoned YNABers as you and Word Tenor are conflating 1) using categories to make spending decisions with 2) using the running balance to ensure correctly supported payment methods are used at the right time.

      Like 1
      • WordTenor
      • Can we agree that goals are dumb and immature? Sure.
      • WordTenor
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life huh-uh, no, you are misreading me and I'll thank you not to.

      The problem arises from: if you enter the transaction at the time it leaves account A, account B is artificially high for a few days. If you wait to enter the transaction until it has landed in account B, account A is artificially high for a few days. Which means neither can be used for spending if the account is to be spent above the level of the transfer. 

      I get that part. 

      The logical answer here, though, is not "create a fake account." It's stop having two accounts if your money is that tight.  If assuming the money is in a place it technically is not for a few days is going to screw with your balances in a way that hurts you, you need more money in one place overall. Or you need to use a PIF credit card. But either way, it's about making the account balance not matter. If it matters, because your transfers are so big that you might get hurt in 24-48 hours, you can't make a transfer as large as the one you just made. 

      Like 1
    • WordTenor 

      WordTenor said:
      huh-uh, no, you are misreading me and I'll thank you not to.

       Thanks for clearing up the misunderstanding. I thought it would be abnormal for you to conflate those. 

       

      WordTenor said:
      The logical answer here, though, is not "create a fake account." It's stop having two accounts if your money is that tight. 

       Actually, I think it's what you said later on.

      WordTenor said:
      you need more money in one place overall... ...you can't make a transfer as large as the one you just made. 

       However, all of those require changes in real life, presumably also requiring communication with the S.O. and then further logistics at banks and other establishments. If this is Breanne 's early stages of YNAB, they may even still be working on trusting the YNAB method/software/their behavioral response to it. I see no issue with representing the messy current reality correctly until it can be streamlined in real life.

      As my husband just said, the whole point of this exercise is to know where the money is that's backing up your purchases. The budget tells you if you have it, but not where to find it. 

      Like 1
  • Breanne said:
    Whether one has 2 accounts or 20, that鈥檚 irrelevant. The goal is to progress in your budget and improve your financial life, and that鈥檚 doable regardless of the number of accounts you have. 

     Heehee. Actually, I was trying to think of the topics that I would accept the stubborn YNAB forum line on, and this was at the top of my list. 

    While succeeding with 20 accounts is certainly *doable* with YNAB, you'll get a whole lot more of an impact by simplifying. 

    The question is - and you don't need to answer here, but do read through that link *edit: I see you did* - why do you have so many accounts?

    You'll have leaps and bounds more financial growth if you and your partner have the paradigm shift that occurs from separating categories and accounts. 

    The limbo you wish for is, as you say, a temporary solution to representing where you are now. If you do allow yourself to grow the YNAB way, you'll soon find it unnecessary. 

    Like
      • Breanne
      • breanne
      • 5 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life Bingo. You get me 鉂わ笍 

      I do look forward to the day I don鈥檛 even have to think about how much is in each account. Ideally, one day we will have a single joint checking account. But you鈥檙e correct, there are logistics involved that have prevented that thus far.

      To name a couple, prior to marrying we both banked with the same credit union. He is still with them, I am not. About 7 years ago we were in a pretty bad spot financially when I lost my job, and my bank account went pretty heavily into the negative because my paychecks stopped coming and I wasn鈥檛 tracking transactions. I never did bring my account back to good standing. As we continue on the path we鈥檙e on now, I鈥檒l eventually prioritize that account and pay them back. Meanwhile, they won鈥檛 allow me to hold an account with them, by myself or as a joint user.

      Husband has been with this bank since he was a child, literally. Since he was eight and his parents opened him an account. So he鈥檚 pretty fixed on 鈥淚鈥檓 never leaving鈥.

      And so, my self-employment earnings are deposited into a CapitalOne 360 account. My income isn鈥檛 consistent, being self employed. So we have all the bills set to autopay from husbands account so I can be sure they get paid. But that means I have to frequently transfer money to his account so that鈥檚 it鈥檚 well-funded. What I leave in my account is for things like gas, groceries, etc. that aren鈥檛 scheduled or on autopay. 

      One of my favorite things about YNAB is the scheduled transactions. I have turned on the option to see the 鈥渇uture balance鈥 in the account, so I can easily see what day his account won鈥檛 have enough money to cover the scheduled transactions, and I can transfer the needed money over with time to spare. 
       

      This explains why I don鈥檛 need it to leave my budget. I have given each dollar a job and know when those jobs will take place so I can make the transfer safely. But the truth of the matter is, it is tight because we鈥檙e new at this. I need these numbers to be 100% accurate at all times because this is what gives me confidence in the process. Until our AOM is 30, 60, 90+ days, I think I鈥檓 going to want this feature improved!

      Like 1
  • This whole discussion comes down to one thing: the cleared balance. That鈥檚 it. That鈥檚 the amount you can trust. End of story.

    The real life delay is absolutely reflected in YNAB. If the funds are cleared, then you can spend them. If they鈥檙e not, you can鈥檛.

    Like 3
    • Superbone Oh, phooey, I was just going to sleep. 

       

      Superbone said:
      The real life delay is absolutely reflected in YNAB. If the funds are cleared, then you can spend them. If they鈥檙e not, you can鈥檛.

       Do you not use the scheduled transactions to look ahead at your cash-flow within an account?

      I mean, I know you're far from going negative, but surely you can imagine the scenario where Account A has $5000, then some near future payments of $6000, and an incoming transfer of another $7000, which means Account B will be lower by $7000, with only $2000 in outflows, but there's no need to transfer more from savings because the dates will all work out. 

      Give or take some zeros, it doesn't matter. Transfers like these happen in the planning stage, and are usually happening to make sure the cleared balance is ready for that future spending.

      I'd say it boils down to the *running balance*, which is used in those planning stages.

      Finally, I'd posit that using a limbo account in YNAB does match reality. They're my dollars, but they're quite literally in limbo between banks. Would I choose to represent that in YNAB? No. I don't want the extra work, and I don't need the precision.

      Anyways, I feel confident that my position has been sufficiently explained. Have a good night!

      Like 2
  • Move Light Sound Life said:
    I mean, I know you're far from going negative, but surely you can imagine the scenario where Account A has $5000, then some near future payments of $6000, and an incoming transfer of another $7000, which means Account B will be lower by $7000, with only $2000 in outflows, but there's no need to transfer more from savings because the dates will all work out. 

    Give or take some zeros, it doesn't matter. Transfers like these happen in the planning stage, and are usually happening to make sure the cleared balance is ready for that future spending.

    I'd say it boils down to the *running balance*, which is used in those planning stages.

    You totally lost me in that first paragraph. If you have any transfers into a payment account, you have to take into account the transfer time when making a payment out of the account. I rarely need to do this but when I do, I always allow the transfer time plus a small buffer.

     

    Move Light Sound Life said:
    Finally, I'd posit that using a limbo account in YNAB does match reality. They're my dollars, but they're quite literally in limbo between banks. Would I choose to represent that in YNAB? No. I don't want the extra work, and I don't need the precision.

    We鈥檒l have to agree to disagree. I find the notion absurd.

    All I can tell you is that in my 10+ years of YNABing, transfer times have never been an issue because I don鈥檛 let them be. And please don鈥檛 ever let me prevent you from going to sleep. 鈽猴笍

    Like 3
  • I won't get into the merits of this request, not something I need but to each their own.   The practical problem with this is the link between money in accounts, to be budgeted and $ budgeted.  Let's say you have a simple budget:

    account A: $1000

    account B: $1000

    To be budgeted is 0(per the method)

    category A: $500

    category B: $750

    category C: $750

     

    You know transfer $500 from A to B.   

    under this approach:

    Account A is now $500

    Account B is $1000 until transfer  clears.

    Suddenly TBB is  ($500) and you can't rely on your category balances or you have to temporarily adjust  categories while money is in transit.  

    The interconnectedness of the accounts, categories and TBB make this a pretty unmanageable feature to implement.   Use cleared vs uncleared and running balance to make sure you don't overdraft during the transition period and if you are moving money between a tracking account and a budget account, use two separate transactions instead of a transfer so you can use a different date. 

    Like 3
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