My Transition from Mvelopes to YNAB

I successfully transitioned from Mvelopes after using it for many years (I used both Mvelopes 4 and 5).  I am writing this post because I wanted to share my experience with everyone and let them know how I transitioned and adjusted from Mvelopes to YNAB.  I hope that others who are looking to switch from Mvelopes to YNAB finds this information helpful.  If any one has a question about Mvelopes, please feel free to reply to this thread and I will gladly answer any questions I can.

 

Overall, I am very happy with my decision to switch.  I really like the interface and the mobile application (iOS), and YNAB support is phenomenal!  Honestly, my biggest frustration with Mvelopes was support (among other things like features disappearing as the product was upgraded), which is why I decided to switch.  The final straw was having my credit card and bank feeds down for over a month and asking for help and not getting a response other than "you can import manually" - that doesn't work for me long term and defeats the purpose of using an app.  YNAB is about double the price if you pay annually, but the added features and more importantly incredible support from YNAB justified the price for me.  Well worth $7/month ($84/year).

 

I’m listing the sections below in the order that I did them/discovered them.  This follows my train of thought in setting up and learning how to use the YNAB application.

 

Category and Category Groups: The very first thing I did in YNAB was setup my categories and category groups.  These are similar if not identical to envelopes and groups in Mvelopes.  I pretty much set them up exactly the same, eliminating the “junk” envelopes I had created in Mvelopes to fix issues with account balances and in the inability to delete transactions in Mvelopes (Yuck!).

 

Bank and Credit Card Accounts: Next I connected my bank and credit card accounts.  I originally had some issues connecting them, but I posted a question in the chat section on YNAB, and OMG I got a response within a day or less like they said they would.  How wonderful and refreshing to have someone actually respond with helpful information instead of apologizing and then providing incredibly general and unhelpful information from Mvelopes (Blah!).

 

Budgets and Funding: Next I transferred my budget information.  I started by entering the amount I budget each month in Mvelopes, but I could not figure out how to “fund” the next month.  I was used to saved budgets and funding plans in Mvelopes.  With the help of the YNAB support team, I realized that what I really wanted to do was to set a monthly goal for each category for the amount I budgeted in Mvelopes.  This makes it really easy to “fund” the next month because all you do is select all the categories and then go to Quick Budget and select the “underfunded” or “goal” amount.  All of the categories then turn from yellow to green, indicating that they are funded.   I also discovered you don’t have to fund everything at once - more of that later when I talk about how I budget incoming funds in real-time. 

 

Envelope Balances: Next I had to figure out how to transfer my envelope balances.  In Mvelopes, I budgeted envelopes in one of two ways.

  • My first type of envelope was for bills due every month (e.g. mortgage, utilities, etc.), or for items that had a monthly spending budget (e.g. groceries, eating out, etc.).  These are simple because I budgeted a fixed amount for each envelope each month, and then at the end of each month, I would “sweep” any underspending out and overspending in.
  • My second type of envelope was for bills due at different times during the year (e.g. property taxes, HOA fees, pest control, etc.), or for savings goals (e.g. vacation, holidays, etc.).  I still budgeted a fixed amount for each envelope each month, but I don’t sweep these envelopes because I let the amount accumulate each month so I can pay the bill when it’s due, or spend the money when I plan to.  I would only “sweep” in/out of these envelopes once the bill was paid and realized the amount was different than what I planned.  Usually, the bill would be slightly more (rarely less), and I would then adjust the monthly budget so that I’m budgeting the right amount each month.  For example, my HOA fees are $150 every 6 months, due in June and December, so I budget $25/month and let the envelope accumulate over time.
  • I started using YNAB in October.  So using my HOA fees as an example, I had saved 4 months, or 4x$25 = $100 (for July, August, September, and October).  I figured out the easiest way to enter this into YNAB was to go to the previous month (i.e. September in my example) and then enter the balances of these envelopes as of the end of September.  Since I was entering it in September, I entered in an amount of $75 (for July, August, and September).  Then the budgeted amount of $25 I entered in October brought the available balance of that category in YNAB to $100, which is exactly what I wanted. I had originally entered $100 in September, but then realized that YNAB was adding another $25 in October, bringing the balance to $125, which was incorrect.  Since I had already funded my envelopes in Mvelopes for October, I had to subtract out one monthly payment for each envelope carrying a balance and enter that into the previous month (i.e. September).  Although the “To Be Budgeted” amount was negative, when I looked at the current month (i.e. October), my “Funds for October” (which shows at the top of the Web UI) was the sum of all my bank and credit card accounts minus the amount I had funded in September, which is exactly what I expected.  Now the money remaining is used to fund the current and future months.

 

Category Assignment: Next, I started assigning categories to incoming transactions.  And OMG, I discovered auto-assignment rules!  YAY!  Mvelopes disabled this feature at some point in Mvelopes 4 (even though you could still setup rules, they just stopped working and never told anyone), and then in Mvelopes 5 there were completely removed, never to return.  I was really upset when Mvelopes removed this feature as it was a time saver.  So I started reviewing transactions every day and assigning them to envelopes manually in Mvelopes.  The nice thing about YNAB is that the rules automatically set themselves up as you start assigning categories (you don’t have to set them up yourself like you did in Mvelopes 4), and the next time a transaction comes in, the category is automatically assigned and you just need to approve the transaction.  Beautiful and very exciting!  I was able to turn off auto-assignment for names like “Amazon” because you buy so many different things into Amazon and there is no way to auto-assign that type of purchase.  To find this hidden gem, click on the “Payee” dropdown when viewing a list of transactions after selecting a bank account and choose “Manage Payees”.  You still have to approve the incoming transactions, but I like this feature because if I don't recognize an expense, I can ask my wife if she recognizes it.

 

Sweeping and Funding: My next struggle was trying to understand how I would “sweep” and “fund” in YNAB.  At the end of each month, I was used to envelopes have balances in Mvelopes, some were overspent, some were underspent, and I would sweep them. Then I would take a saved budget and use that to fund my envelopes.  YNAB has a different way of doing this, and it happens more in real-time.  Once you understand the YNAB methodology and the reason behind “giving every dollar a job”, it actually makes sense.  It takes some getting used to, but I think the biggest benefit of this approach is that it forces you to make decisions about how you spend money and where it comes from, instead of doing things like I used to do in Mvelopes like let envelopes go negative month over month to “save money over time” and leave my “savings” envelopes untouched.  Instead in YNAB, you immediately correct overspending for a category, and you immediately fund categories when you receive new income, and you manage your budgeting with goals for each category.  In Mvelopes terms, you are sweeping and funding in real-time, which I think gives you a better picture as to where you stand financially.  I’ll explain how I do this in the next few sections.

 

Funding in YNAB: In Mvelopes, I had a saved budget that I would apply each month.  The equivalent to this in YNAB is setting a monthly goal for each category.  This accomplishes the same result.  By setting a monthly goal for each category, you can then easily “fund” your categories by selecting the ones you wish to fund and then use the “Quick Budget” button and select “Underfunded”.  This will move money from the “To Be Budgeted” category (“Unallocated Money” in Mvelopes) and move it to each category in YNAB.  It is helpful to put categories in groups that are funded in the same way (e.g. are of the same importance) so that you can select all categories in that group and fund them with one click.

  • When you receive new income, instead of letting income accumulate in the “Unallocated Money” envelope in Mvelopes, I immediately assign any new income that shows up in the “To Be Budgeted” category to next month’s budget.  This keeps my “To Be Budgeted” amount at 0 at all times.  My wife and I both receive paychecks bi-weekly, so every other week, I go into YNAB and start assigning that income to categories in next month’s budget.  I start with the category groups that are critical (e.g. monthly bills like the mortgage, utilities, etc.) and fund those first.  Then when the next set of paychecks come in later in the month, I fund the rest.  This is a little bit of extra work, but I found that it does two things: (1) it prevents you from spending that money elsewhere, and (2) when you start the next month, it’s already funded for you.  Personally, I like seeing the “To Be Budgeted” amount at 0 - it just feels good.

 

Sweeping in YNAB: At the end of each month in Mvelopes, I would sweep before funding the next month.  This allowed me to take care of overspending and underspending and take the total difference and put it somewhere.  In YNAB, this is done in two different ways.

  • Overspending: In Mvelopes, I would allow envelopes to go negative.  YNAB immediately notifies you when overspending occurs.  What I decided to in YNAB whenever a category is overspent is to either move funds from a different category into the overspent category, or move it from savings.  To move, just click the amount and tell the system where to move the money from.  By funding overspending immediately as opposed to waiting to the end of the month, it forces you to make a decision where the money is coming from.  And when you take it from savings, it hurts.  So if you stick to your budget and take it from a discretionary category like “eating out”, you may decide to eat at home instead.
  • Underspending: If you have funds left over in any category at the end of the month, just select those categories and choose the option “Set Available Amount to 0”.  I can only find this option in the Web UI.  This moves the remaining funds back to the “To Be Budgeted” category where you can allocate them to another category in the next month (or put it into savings).  If you put categories that you want to do this with in the same group, or put those groups together, you can easily select those groups and then release the remaining funds.  Note you can select multiple groups or categories by different groups by just checking the boxes next to the groups or individual categories when using the "Quick Budget" feature.

 

Reconcile Balances: In YNAB, you can reconcile your balances.  I do this once a month to make sure my YNAB balance matches my bank and credit card balances.  This is something that Mvelopes used to have and was also taken away.  Usually these balances always match because I link my bank and CC accounts directly and import all the transactions.  But if for any reason a discrepancy is found, YNAB lets you make an adjustment to the “To Be Budgeted” category in one click to reconcile the difference, which makes it super simple to get things back into sync.  One of the things I hated about Mvelopes was that I was not able to delete transactions that were imported.  This was incredibly frustrating because sometimes duplicate transactions were created and there was nothing I could do about them.  And sometimes I did not catch duplicate transactions and I would end up in a situation where Mvelopes said I spent more than I did, and I ended up creating offset accounts and envelopes to try and fix it.  It’s so nice being able to reconcile and delete things if you want.  And I have yet to find a duplicate transaction in YNAB, but if it does happen at least I can delete it myself.

 

Funds for X in YNAB: Another challenge I had in YNAB was the “Funds for X” calculation that you see at the top of the screen in the Web UI.  I had no idea where this number was coming from.  I realized that it was the sum of all transactions assigned to the category “To Be Budgeted” and have a date in the same month, which actually makes sense.  

 

Credit Card Category: The credit card category took a little bit to get used to.  In Mvelopes, I made sure that my credit card envelope always showed my current balance.  When I would make a credit card payment in Mvelopes, I would enter a pending transaction so that my debt was reduced (since I would often schedule this payment to happen later in the month).  Sometimes I would have to do a transfer to a fictitious envelope which I called an “offset” to get the debt balance to match.  In YNAB, I discovered that YNAB wants you to budget for your credit card payment, which the amount comes out of your “To Be Budgeted” amount.  In Mvelopes, I was not used to doing this.  Since I always pay my credit card balance off each month, I simply budget the amount that YNAB tells me, and it works great.  There are special goals you can set in YNAB for credit card categories, which are different than regular category goals, either paying a fixed amount each month or paying it off each month, so you can adjust this however you want to manage your debt.  The default is to pay the credit card in total each month to avoid building up debt.

  • NOTE: When I first setup my credit card, I had used the reconciled balance feature to adjust for transactions already paid.  This caused YNAB to set the incorrect goal amount to budget for the credit card payment.  To resolve, I removed the reconciliation and the starting balance entries and then re-reconciled the account.  This fixed YNAB's total calculations.

 

Reimbursable Expenses: I had to handle reimbursable expenses differently in YNAB (i.e. expenses that we incur that are reimbursed by our employers).  In Mvelopes, I was used to assigning these expenses to an envelope and letting it go negative, and then when we were reimbursed, I would transfer the incoming amount to that envelope to bring its balance back to 0.  In YNAB, I still assign it to a category for reimbursable expenses, but I fund the overspending with money from savings (again, the money has to come from somewhere until you get reimbursed).  I also create a scheduled transaction under our credit card account with a date I expect to be reimbursed and split the payment with the amount of each transaction and set the category to “To Be Budgeted”.  This reminds me to expect this incoming payment and to put it back into savings once we are reimbursed.  I would be nice if the system could automatically create this scheduled transaction, but this doesn't happen that often so its not a big deal for us.  

 

My One and Only Complaint about YNAB: There is really only one thing I don’t like.  I use Capital One and I have re-authenticate myself every time I want to import transactions.  (This doesn’t happen for my other accounts with other banks).  I usually like to check my transactions this daily, so this is a bit annoying.  But honestly, Mvelopes had the same problem and it has something to do with Capital One's recent change in security requirements (its news all over Google).  The good news is that it is easier (and faster) to re-authenticate in YNAB, especially if you do it on your phone (iOS has a neat feature that will pull a code from an SMS onto the clipboard so you can paste into YNAB when you receive the SMS with the code).  I would love YNAB and Capital One to figure something out so this isn’t necessary every time you wish to import transactions, but I’ll take this annoyance any day as I feel YNAB overall is a much better product.  And like I said, support is wonderful, and that combined with a well-built product with additional features like auto-assigned categories and the ability to delete transactions, convinced me to switch to YNAB.  

 

Like I said, if anyone has any questions about switching from Mvelopes, I'm more than happy to answer if I can - just reply to this thread.

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  • Nice summary. I'm sure this will be useful for others who have/will switch as well. Along those lines, these two points jumped out at me...

    Funds for X: there is more to it than you mentioned, most notably money from last month's Budgeted in the Future is also included. However the FFX  number isn't terribly important in and of itself. It is actually TBB that matters, and more importantly, making TBB $0 (Rule 1). FWIW, just search All Accounts for TBB if you want to know what you brought in.

    Reimbursements: you should categorize the reimbursement to the same category. Categorizing as TBB skews report totals.

    Like 1
      • Art
      • Blue_Piranha.4
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui thanks for the explanation on the funds amount.  I figured that as well (includes amount from amount budgeted in future for previous month).  The reason why this was important to me at first was because I had no idea where this number was coming from.  It would’ve great if you could just click on it to see the activity associated with the number.  When I see a number or a total or a calculation, I need to know exactly how that number is being derived.  Mainly because at first it said I had a much larger number than I thought I had and no idea why.

      for reimbursements, are you saying I should assign it to the reimbursement category in the scheduled transaction?  If I do that, won’t a balance become available in the category when the payment is recorded?  Actually for me, I think it would be better to put it back towards my savings category, since that’s where I took it from originally.  I think I’ll do that instead since that makes sense for my situation and how I budget for reimbursable expenses.  Thanks for the tip. 

      Like
    • Art said:
      If I do that, won’t a balance become available in the category when the payment is recorded?

      Sure, which is precisely the point -- to replace the cash so it's available to handle the next reimbursement. Additionally, reports remain accurate (the transactions net to $0). What happens in the budget is 6 of one, half-dozen of the other kind of thing. If you're going to move things, you can just as easily move from the Reimbursement category as TBB.

      Art said:
      I think it would be better to put it back towards my savings category, since that’s where I took it from originally

      If you do this, do it via the budget (the Move Money Tool or direct budget entries). Again, putting it back to your savings category via direct categorization of the inflow transaction skews reports, leaving the Reimbursement category with more spending and your savings category with less spending.

      Like 2
  • Art said:
    I fund the overspending with money from savings (again, the money has to come from somewhere until you get reimbursed).

    Perhaps a subtle thing, but it's often easier to leave those funds in the reimbursement category, in advance of the next usage.

    They are, of course, available to reallocate if needed elsewhere (as is ANY category), but until then they're awfully useful backing the reimbursements. The point of this is that it saves one the need to manually move funds to the CC Payment category. 

    However, not everyone has the cash to front reimbursements (especially large ones), and therefore use temporary CC debt instead of budgeting to the reimbursement category. Tip: if the reimbursement category turns green from the reimbursement, move those funds to the appropriate CC Payment category.

    Like 1
  • Art said:
    I would love YNAB and Capital One to figure something out so this isn’t necessary every time you wish to import transactions, but I’ll take this annoyance any day as I feel YNAB overall is a much better product.

    Betterment does a cool thing where they generate special passwords for each unique software that hooks up with it. It works flawlessly with YNAB. Let’s hope Capital One does something like that because I too have a CO credit card and it is quite annoying.

    Like 1
    • Khaki Storm
    • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
    • Khaki_Storm.1
    • 1 yr ago
    • Reported - view

    Wonderful guide. I came from the desktop software before Mvelopes. I'd been limping along with it unsupported for years and made the switch to YNAB about 1 yr ago. One add: the reports aren't great so add consistent details to the memo field for quick summaries later. Related, this post explained the search abilities that replaced the reports I was looking for: https://support.youneedabudget.com/t/q5warf/feature-request-share

    Like
      • Art
      • Blue_Piranha.4
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Khaki Storm Thanks for the tip.  I recently discovered tracking BA budgeting accounts so I may link my other financial accounts to see if I can total up net worth.  Today I use a product called “Personal Capital” to track retirement accounts and investments but if I can do this in YNAB, or at least see the balances, that would be great.

      I use memos for purchases like from Amazon because even though I assign them to the correct category, if I look at them in the future I’ll have no idea what I purchased.

      Thanks for the tips.

      Like 1
  • Art said:
    put it back towards my savings category, since that’s where I took it from originally

    Hopefully you're being far more specific about categories than what I bolded. EVERY category in YNAB is actually "savings". After all, saving is merely deferred spending. Might be saved for a week, or perhaps a couple years. What are you saving for? Car replacement? Household repair? Car repair? Vacation? Christmas?

    A vague, generic category like "savings" prohibits it from participating in the hierarchy of priority that will naturally develop. (Taking money from "savings" doesn't have any concrete consequences, but taking from Vacation does.) It's a wonderful thing to shift money from a lower priority category to one of higher priority (encouraged, actually -- see Rule 3). There's little worse in budgeting than going the opposite direction.

    Breaking up a large, generic "savings" category also combats the natural tendency humans have to essentially mentally inflate what we think that money can do. The same thing happens when estimating how much time it will take to do something -- break it down into concrete steps and you'll typically find it's a) longer and b) more accurate.

    Like 4
      • Art
      • Blue_Piranha.4
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui My “savings” category is really my emergency fund.  This is where extra money goes after everything else has been budgeted for, and don’t worry I must have over 50-75 categories where things are budgeted separately or goals are built.  I have a goal for my emergency fund and I like to keep it at a certain amount (in case something tragic happens and need cash to pay for a hospital bill or something like that).  So it’s not a generic “savings” category. 

      Like
  • Art said:
    I immediately assign any new income that shows up in the “To Be Budgeted” category to next month’s budget.  This keeps my “To Be Budgeted” amount at 0 at all times.

    While this is great in theory, you will want to be careful about keeping TBB $0 due to an implementation/design flaw in YNAB. When TBB = $0, you will NOT have any obvious indication if you've double-booked funds between now and in the future.

    Example, you have $1000, with $500 budgeted to the current month and $500 budgeted to next month. TBB = $0. An accidental entry of $444 in some category in the current month will leave TBB at $0, rather than showing -$444!

    Mistakes will happen -- and have happened to many users, as this flaw has existed from launch -- and you have no reliable indication of an issue until you actually switch to next month where you see a negative TBB. By then it may be too late, having spent money after being mislead by inflated category balances.

    One workaround is to leave $1 in TBB. A better solution (IMHO) is to install the Toolkit Extension, which puts an indication that you're double-booked right in the header.

    Like 2
      • Art
      • Blue_Piranha.4
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui Funny I noticed this issue as well (over budgeting not showing up until next month).  Are you saying if you leave TBB to $1 it will show up?  Also what is the Toolkit Extension?  Where do I find it?

      Like
    • Art Assuming no cash overspending, a current TBB of $1 guarantees the future TBB is also $1. The indication of a potential problem is if the current TBB is not $1.

      Google YNAB Toolkit Extension! I wouldn't run nYNAB without it.

      Like
  • Oh my goodness, THANK YOU for this! Mvelopes has finally really screwed up this time and I don't want to deal with it anymore, but the idea of starting over is terrifying to me. You've just saved my life! Thank you!

    Like 2
      • Alaskan Otter
      • Not a YNAB expert by any means, but willing to help where I can.
      • alaskan_otter
      • 11 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Sorry, I have questions now that I'm mostly converted over. I'm starting in November, so I went to October and entered all my envelope balances as "budgeted" in October. This leaves me available balances going into November which match the envelope balances I had in Mvelopes. Score! (I hope that's right!)

      So... now I need to enter what WAS my budget (in Mvelopes) for November. I get that there aren't any funding plans - do I really need to enter all of these amounts every month manually? And do I have to wait until payday to do it? Or can I enter them all ahead of time and then when the money drops into my account, just... this is where I get lost. How do I tell it where to put my paycheck and what to hold off on until next check? I guess I'm losing something in translation as it pertains to the Mvelopes funding plans.

      Like 1
      • satcook
      • satcook
      • 11 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      Alaskan Otter you can set a goal for each category which will help you budget quicker. 

       

      You don't budget however until you have the actual money in hand. 

      You will need to record any transactions done at the end of October into your October budget. 

      Like 3
      • Art
      • Blue_Piranha.4
      • 11 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Alaskan Otter I contacted support about this and their recommendation was to create goals for each category.  This is just like having a saved funding plan in Mvelopes.  Then, when the next month comes, just go to quick budget (you can select all categories or just the ones you want), and then use the option “underfunded”.  It will then automatically fund each envelope based upon your goal.  
       

      I have been chatting with support (they are really fantastic - just start a conversation within the app to ask questions and they are happy to help and provide very detailed responses).  They said that if you wait until the first of the month (actually needs to be Nov 1) then when you do underfunded, the system will fund the difference between anything you had left over and your monthly goal.  Honestly I haven’t tried this yet (waiting until Nov 1 to try) but if this works I may not even have to sweep (ie use the option “set available amounts to 0”) to reclaim unused budgeted funds.

      As far as your incoming paychecks, I had similar questions.  I used to sweep and fund at the star of each month in Mvelopes, and I almost always had enough of saved in “Unallocated Money” to fund next months spend.  You can just leave it in “To Be Budgeted” as you receive paychecks and then use quick budget to fund your goals for each category at the start of the month.  However, YNAB recommends that you start funding the next months categories as paychecks come in so that “To Be Budgeted” is always 0.  I actually started doing it this way and like it actually.  By doing it this way, by the time the end of them month comes around, it’s already funded for you.  Now for myself, I cannot afford to completely fund all categories until all paychecks are received at the end of the month.  So what I started doing is funding category groups based upon importance.  For example, I have a category group called “Bills Monthly” which have all the bills that must be paid (eg mortgage, etc).  When a paycheck comes in (which is twice a month for us on the same day - convenient), I find that category first.  To do this, just click the checkbox on the category group and then use quick budget to fund those categories with underfunded amounts. This will automatically take your paycheck in “To Be Budgeted” and fund the amounts using your category goals.  It’s almost like partial funding, which would have been hard to do in Mvelopes.

      Honestly I would try it different ways to see which works best for you.  Either partially fund when paychecks come in or leave in “To Be Budgeted” until the end of the month and then fund.  Either way by having monthly goals set on every category, you can fund very easily by using the “underfunded” quick budget feature.

      Like 1
      • Art
      • Blue_Piranha.4
      • 11 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Alaskan Otter Your very welcome.  I finally hit a tipping point with Mvelopes, too.  Lack of support and running into serious issues and no help.  YNAB is completely the opposite.  Support is wonderful, and when they say they typically reply in a day, they really do.  I even get replies over the weekend.  I had a question about the amounts that were being calculated and they asked me to grant them support access and then they recorded a little video for me explaining everything.  I’d be lucky with Mvelopes is they responded to me, usually with an apology and then some canned response which wasn’t helpful and was stuff I already tried.

      Im happy to help as well.  Feel free to reply if have any other questions.

      Like 1
      • monkeyhanger
      • No animals were harmed
      • monkeyhanger.1
      • 11 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      There's a third option that is used by most long-term YNAB users who transitioned from the older versions of YNAB. They create a funds for next month category and store all funds there until releasing them to budget the following month. This allows you to always maintain TBB at $0 as recommended but avoids all the problems that are associated with budgeting into the future - the stealing from the future issue, having to flit between different months, having to make too many changes if plans change, etc.
       

      Like 1
  • Alaskan Otter

    UPDATE on Sweeping: I discovered that is really not necessary to "Sweep" like I used to do in Mvelopes.  The reason why is because if you are managing over spending, you are already pulling extra money from other categories.  And, if you setup your goals with the correct type, YNAB will automatically fund the difference to the amount you wish to budget.  For example, if you have a category with a monthly goal of $100, and you spent $75 in October, when you use the underfunded option to fund your categories in November, YNAB will fund the difference of $25.  The trick to this is that you must wait until the next month starts so YNAB can finalize the amount of money spent in the previous month.  So neat!  

    Note that there are two different types of monthly goals.  A monthly "funding" goal, which says you want to set aside so much money each month for spending.  This is when YNAB automatically funds the difference.  A "monthly contribution" savings goal says that you want to set aside a fixed amount each month to save, regardless of what was spent previously.  The monthly contribution goal is perfect for savings or categories that you use for periodic bills where you set aside a fixed amount each month so you have enough to pay when the bill comes.  Setting the correct goal type is important to make sure that YNAB funds correctly the following month.  I originally had everything setup as "monthly" goals, but once I realized how the "underfunded" option works when using Quick Budget to fund the next month, I realized that if I changed the goal type everything funded exactly the way I expected.  And best of all I saved a step - no need to "sweep".

    Like 2
  • Art  This is very helpful!  Thank you!  I'm doing a free trial of YNAB to see what I think.  I'm moving from MV4.  I don't like not carrying negative balances, but I may simply resign myself to "funding" them via a "rainy day" or "emergency" fund and tracking the real envelopes and their corresponding overages in Excel from month to month until they're zeroed out.  Doing it this way would simply mean that I have a budgeted amount in YNAB of $0 until they're positive again.  I just need to track the money paying them off in Excel each month and keep the total correct in the offset fund (whatever I call it).

    Like
  • I realize this topic is a little old but I would like some advice.  I thought I was following along with most of this but now I am confused.

    I am also trying to find a way to leave Mvelopes.  For all of the reasons mentioned above, it is time to move.  However, I have such a system down that works for me. I want to be able to replicate it as close as possible.  My wife doesn't handle change well and if I have to teach her a new way to track our budget/spending, it is going to be really hard to keep it all straight.  That being said, here is how I have used Mvelopes for years.

    1.  Create the budget for a year out on the budget screen.  Being able to set this amount for all months or adjust for certain months is perfect for me.  I often tweak it as the year rolls on too and then adjust the funding plan.

    2.  After creating the budget, I add mine and my wife's income.  She is paid on the 15th and 30th each month and I am bi-weekly.  I set up the funding plan for each month.  Most of the time, our envelopes are funded with different amounts from all of our different checks throughout the month depending on what time of month the bills are due.  This is where the funding plan works well... I can assign specific amounts to each check that will eventually lead to the envelope being full by the time the bill is due.  Sometimes the money may come from all checks in that month or start with checks at the end of one month and finish with checks at the beginning of the next month to pay a bill at mid month.  I have not figured out a good way to do this in YNAB.

    3.  Once we are paid, I can either fund with that check's saved funding plan as is or make tweaks to the saved funding plan before I fund the envelopes.  Not sure how I would do that in YNAB.

    4.  I carry negative balances in envelopes.  This works for us.  If we overspend but can't afford to move money from another envelope, we see the red as an "IOU" to that envelope and work to pay ourselves back as we have extra income or leftover money we can sweep into it.  I understand this can defeat the purpose of the budget but it fits the way we live and has worked well for us.  I really need to determine how to be able to make this work in YNAB.

    5.  We easily have 50+ envelopes but without an actual funding plan page, it is hard to see how exactly that envelope is going to be funded each month.  I have tried labeling the "categories" with a description that lets me know but it is a lot a work and can be hard to fully understand.  This also helps when assigning the category since you can't see the "goal" for that category when you are assigning money to it.

     

    I really want to make this work like we are using Mvelopes and I hope it can, I just may not be understanding how exactly to do  it.  I am a couple weeks into my trial so I need to know if it can work before I have to decide whether to make the move or not.  I am a lifetime member at Mvelopes so I don't want to commit to moving to YNAB until I am sure I can make it work like we are used to.

    Thanks for any and all help!

    Like
  • Greetings!

    I don't know that I am capable of laying out a full plan for you, but I do have some initial thoughts as someone who crossed over a few months back.

    First off, there IS definitely a learning curve. Your wife may struggle with it; I did. But the "other guys" service is breaking and, in my experience, could no longer be trusted. That can lead to some pretty serious problems with your finances. To me, it's worth the hassle of a new process if it means your money is safe and your system can be trusted at all times. Just know right now that this operates a little differently - but I found most differences boil down to terminology. I had a really hard time with not actually scheduling my income, and not doing funding plans anymore. It seemed so loosey-goosey! Once I forced myself to accept that, and instead imagine a big pot of money from which I fill all our envelopes, it became significantly simpler.

    Each time someone gets paid, that money just goes into "To Be Budgeted" (TBB). There's really no need to have the income scheduled. It just comes when it comes, as it always has. Instead of a funding plan, you have a budget. In YNAB, your "budget" is your funding plan, basically. You can still have your 50 envelopes or you can reorganize them any way you like. I like the non-clunky feel of YNAB when it comes to customizing my budget ("envelopes"). The key to making this work is to enter a goal for every envelope. My mortgage is $2000 a month. In my Mortgage category, I have a goal to budget $2000 a month to that category. (There are several types of goals, not just "budget this much to this category each month."

    When my husband or I get paid, I go down the line and choose which categories get money, out of whatever's available in TBB. (Side note, I have my "envelopes" sorted by the time of the month they are due, instead of alphabetically. That way when I go to budget my money with the first check of the month, I'm giving that money to the bills that are due the first part of the month.

    When you run out of money in TBB, you're done doling out money until you get more money. Simple as that! You can have negative balances in YNAB, but you will want to zero them up before you move to the next month's budgeting, or your numbers will be off and you'll get yourself in trouble. Even if this means you have to wait for your first check in February and then go back a month and use that money in TBB to zero up negatives from January, so be it. Get January all cleaned up, then start February with whatever's in TBB.

    Does this make sense? I HIGHLY recommend you look up Nick True's videos about YNAB on YouTube. He has some great intro type videos that helped me immensely in understanding how this works. I promise, once you figure it out and accept it's a new system, it is magnificent. So much easier and user friendly than the other one was, at least for me.

    Feel free to holler at me with specific questions and I'll do my best. I'm no expert but I'm up to help if I can.

    Like 1
  • Thank you.

    So, the problem I have is that I have to keep that envelope negative until I can pay myself back.  I don't have the extra money to bring it current before month end.  We always considered this as loaning money to ourselves.  Again, I know that defeats the purpose but it has always worked for us when we had to do it.  Is there any way you can think of to make this work for us?

    My next follow up question... in Mvelopes, the balances of the envelopes would carry over.  For instance, if we are adding funds to an envelope to carry over so we can pay a quarterly bill, it would be there next month.  I am assuming it would show up in the available column, right?

    I get setting the goals as the monthly budget, however, why does the budget column start over at $0 each month?  Do I have to manually adjust those amounts to equal my goals?

    Lastly, I am starting a fresh budget right now to play with it during the trial.  How do I need to best populate my categories to match my current envelope balances in Mvelopes.

    I will check out the videos, I just can't watch them right now while at work.

    Like
  • I found the answer I needed to carry over the negative category.  I am essentally waiting to reimburse myself.

    Temporary Overspending

    This method is only recommended when the reimbursable expense occurred on a credit card. Because money hasn't been immediately removed from your bank, you can let that overspending sit for a short time while you wait for your friend (or sister or boss) to reimburse you.

     

    1

    Record the expense as usual.

    2

     

    If you receive the reimbursement in the same month as the expense and you haven't made a credit card payment since recording the expense, categorize the deposit with the same category as the original expense. This will offset that expense, and money will be moved to your Credit Card Payment category to be set aside for payment

     

    3

     

    If you receive the reimbursement in a future month or after you've paid off your card, the credit overspending will have been absorbed as debt into your credit card balance. Categorize the deposit back to the original spending category, and then move the money to your Credit Card Payment category.

     

    Now I am trying to figure out how to keep the same budget every month like I had in the budget page of envelopes.  The budget column in YNAB is reset to zero each month.  Do I have to manually populate that every month?

    Like
  • Gold Leopard said:
    I don't have the extra money to bring it current before month end

    The reality is you ALREADY sent off money that was earmarked for some other purpose. You're supposed to cover that overspending immediately to reflect that money is gone. (Actually, the recommended approach is to reallocate BEFORE overspending.)

    This prevents you from thinking you have money that you really don't. This leads to further prioritization and spending reduction so money is actually available for the things that matter.

    Like 2
  • Gold Leopard said:
    The budget column in YNAB is reset to zero each month.  Do I have to manually populate that every month?

    Yes, once you receive additional money. If you don't have enough to cover the entire month, budget as far as that money will take you. Finish when you get more money.

    Like
  • I just saw your post so I figured I would put in my two cents.

    Regarding your goals, there are two different goal types: monthly spending goal and monthly contribution savings goal.  The monthly spending goal is for things that you want to set aside to spend for a given month.  For example, if you set aside $500 for groceries each month, and you spend $420 in that month, at the end of the month you'll have $80 remaining.  When you use the quick budget feature, and choose "underfunded", the system will calculate the difference and add another $420 to that category (e.g. envelope) so your monthly spending total is once again $500. The trick to making this work is that you must run the quick budget feature and choose "underfunded" when that month actually arrives (e.g. the 1st of the month).  If you run it before the end of the month, it doesn't work as expected because YNAB thinks you are budgeting in the future and doesn't know how much you have available yet (since the month has not yet completed).

    The monthly contribution goal is for saving up a fixed amount each month.  For example, if you have a $120 bill once a year, you may want to setup a monthly contribution goal of $10 so that in 12 months you'll have $120 saved.  This type of goal always puts $10 in the category (i.e. envelope) when you use the quickbudget and select the "underfunded" feature to fund your categories.  Again, wait until the next month actually arrives before running the quick budget feature.

    If you setup all of your goals for each category (usually monthly spending goal or monthly contribution savings goal), and then use the quick budget feature to with the underfunded option at the start of each month, this should be very similar to what you used to do when "funding your envelopes" in Mvelopes.

    YNAB doesn't have the notion of a funding plan for each paycheck like Mvelopes.  The Quick Budget feature is for the full month.  When you use the quick budget, you can choose all categories (the default) or select individual categories or choose a category group to fund those categories all at once.  If you organize your categories into groups this way (e.g. a category group for your Mvelopes funding plan), then you'll be able to easily fund different categories by just selecting the group when you receive different paychecks.  Not exactly the same as an Mvelope funding plan, but similar.

    I would recommend (if you can afford it) to get to a point when you can fund an entire month using the money you earned from the previous month.   This is what I do and it makes it much easier, but I realize depending on your situation you'll have to save to get to that point.  What I do instead of leaving that money in "To Be Budgeted" is I created a category called "Next Month" and put our paychecks in there.  Then when the next month occurs, I take the money out of the "Next Month" category and put it back into "To Be Budgeted" and then use the Quick Budget feature with the underfunded option at the start of each month.  I used to budget in the future, but that got confusing and potentially leads to underbudgeting.

    As far as negatives amount go, I used to do that in Mvelopes, too.  But after using YNAB (about 6 months now), I realized that letting categories go negative is very misleading.  I used to do this with vacation, paying myself back a little each month after going on vacation.  The reality is when you do this, you are really pulling money from somewhere else and you just don't realize it, and you are tricking yourself into thinking that money is actually there in other categories when it really is not.  YNAB is designed (and encourages you) to pull money from other categories when overspending occurs, which forces you to make decisions as to where you can actually spend your money.  I realize this may be hard, especially if you don't have the money, or cannot spend money from another category because that is reserved to pay certain bills.  This happened to me too, and YNAB forced me to start looking at the categories that had the largest goal amounts and I figured out how to reduce them to save more money.  As a result, my wife and I refinanced our home, we reduced our utility bills by cutting electricity and water usage, and we switched cell phone carriers.  We also stopped eating out as much and started doing pizza and a movie with the kids on Friday nights instead of going out to eat (much cheaper and kids still love it).  YNAB has a neat feature that tracks your "age of money".  They say when it reaches 30 days it's a game changer, and I'll tell you it certainly is.  While it may be tough, cutting expenses here and there to achieve 30 days is very liberating.  I'm currently at 91 days and climbing.  Yay!

    I hope you find this information useful.  If you have other questions feel free to post and I will respond when I can.

    Like 3
  • Thanks Art .  I'd love to get to a point where I can budget a month ahead.  It will take some time though.  I have assigned most of my categories to have a monthly contribution amount and a few to have the progressive.

    So, for instance... I put what I had available from each envelope in Mvelopes into the budgeted category in YNAB for February.  As transactions clear, obviously my available amounts will change.  What I have done so far to try and mimic a funding plan...

    1. I scheduled an inflow transaction that splits my check by how much I want to fund each category when it comes in.  It appears to me that this will act just like the funding plan did in Mvelopes.  It should increase my available amounts accordingly, however, I am guessing YNAB is going to think that I came in over budget since what I had in the budgeted amount was only what I have available when I started using YNAB this month.  Is this a problem or just something I can ignore until next month?

    2.  I am trying to understand if I can make the underbudgeted feature work for me.  So at the beginning of March, will my available balances roll over?  If so, when I populate the budgeted columns with the underbudgeted tool, how do I keep my available amounts looking like more than I actually have until I get my paycheck and "fund" the categories?

    Like
  • Gold Leopard said:
    1. I scheduled an inflow transaction that splits my check by how much I want to fund each category when it comes in.  It appears to me that this will act just like the funding plan did in Mvelopes.  It should increase my available amounts accordingly, however, I am guessing YNAB is going to think that I came in over budget since what I had in the budgeted amount was only what I have available when I started using YNAB this month.  Is this a problem or just something I can ignore until next month?

    I recall when I first starting using YNAB, the first month was tricky.  Once you complete a full month and start a new month fresh, it should be okay.  The only problem I see with a split is that the when you put money into a category directly, it won't change the budget but rather the available balance.  I still think you are better off organizing your categories into groups as to how you want them funded (e.g. Your Bills, Your Spouse's Bills).  Then you can easily use the Quick Budget feature, select the category group (e.g. Your Bills), and then click Underfunded to fund just the categories in that group.

    Gold Leopard said:
    2.  I am trying to understand if I can make the underbudgeted feature work for me.  So at the beginning of March, will my available balances roll over?  If so, when I populate the budgeted columns with the underbudgeted tool, how do I keep my available amounts looking like more than I actually have until I get my paycheck and "fund" the categories?

    Yes, at the beginning of March (i.e. when it's actually March 1), any available balance in any category will rollover.  It would be helpful if you could provide an example, but I'll give you one to see if this will help.  If you have a category called "Groceries" and at the end of Feb (Feb 29) you have $40 available, then on March 1, when you QuickBudget and choose "underfunded", the system will calculate the difference between the available balance and the monthly spending goal.  So if you monthly spending goal was $250, the system will budget $210 ($250 monthly spending goal March - $40 available balance Feb) so that you reach your target available balance of $250 for March.  Of course, this assumes that when you start the month, you actually have money in the "To Be Budgeted" category so you can actually budget it.

    Let's say you start March and you have available balances in categories.  Those available balances will remain in Feb.  If you don't receive your paycheck until March 5, then from March 1 to March 5, you can only spend what you have in your available categories.  Then on March 5 when your paycheck arrives, you can fund those categories using Quick Budget.  Until March 5, your budgeted amounts will be $0, even though you have available balances.  If you spend more than your available balance, it'll say you overspent.

    I think where you are struggling is you are trying to "pay yourself back" instead of "taking the money you have and determine where you can spend it.  This was a big mind shift for me as well.  I really think you have to take the approach "what cash do I have" and "how do I want to budget what I have today", and then when your next paycheck comes in, then budget that money again.  It's really how YNAB is designed to work.  Like I said earlier, one of the big things with Mvelopes is that those don't enforce this rule.  This is why I'm suggesting grouping your categories into groups based upon how you want to fund them, so you can easily fund them when a paycheck comes in.

    I think my suggestion would work for Bills, but I'm not sure about things like Groceries.  If you know how much you spend each month on Groceries, that should be your budget for the month.  Let's say thats $500 a month, but you get $250 of that from your first paycheck and $250 from the next.  The only way I can see doing this is you have to manually fund this amount, because Quick Budget wants to fund the entire amount.  If this is the case, I would recommend that you don't fund Groceries until later in the month and let the category go negative.  Then when the paycheck comes in, fund the overspending on Groceries.  That way you won't have to manually split things.  As long as you fund your overspending before the end of the month, I think you'll be okay.  My advice would be to divide your categories into groups based upon your Mvelopes funding plan for each paycheck, and do this until you can get to the point when you can fund an entire month's worth of bills at the start of the month.  Then you can reorganize the category groups more appropriately.

    Like
  • Gold Leopard said:
    I scheduled an inflow transaction that splits my check by how much I want to fund each category when it comes in.

    This is a bad idea. Spending will total $0 as it will be cancelled by the inflow.

    Use goals to reduce the effort each month. You said you could push income into next month, so this should be a 2-click endeavour at the beginning of each month.

    Like
  • Gold Leopard said:
    when I populate the budgeted columns with the underbudgeted tool, how do I keep my available amounts looking like more than I actually have

    Wait until you actually have it before hitting the Underfunded button in the new month's area.

    Like
  • Art said:
    Let's say thats $500 a month, but you get $250 of that from your first paycheck and $250 from the next.

     For this, there are a few possibilities used by people in YNAB:

    • put the budget amount per paycheck in the category name. Note if you put this amount in all your category names, you pretty much have the funding plan from Mvelopes except it doesn't help you to automate anything.
    • have a Grocery category per paycheck.

    Both work, it depends on your preference. Solution 2 lets you group your categories per paycheck. Solution 1 means fewer categories. When you will be able to budget per month blocks if you use solution 2 you will have to merge the categories into one. With solution 1, you only need to rename the category.

    Like
  • Ceeses said:
    have a Grocery category per paycheck.

    I wouldn't do this. YNAB will automatically categorize based on Payee, so you will be constantly fighting the tool and making errors.

    This approach makes more sense if you FULLY fund a given category from a given check (avoiding duplicates). You then have check-specific categories in each check group. (The drawback is it's hard to find these subsets, and clarity suffers as well.)

    Personally, I think the partially funding all categories is the better option. It's simply the True Expense concept applied on a paycheck basis. Just go down there list, budgeting the per-check amount. If you setup goals or scheduled transactions, the SECOND check can be budgeted with the Underfunded Quick Budget button.

    Like 1
  • We were just forced to upgrade to Mvelopes 5 after 2 previous failed attempts and the lost features and continued bugs have left me looking for a better option and we're going to give YNAB a try. My wife usually adjusts the budget and prefers to do it on her phone. This article/video recommends selecting all of the items to see the underfunded total to check if it's reasonable, but is there a way to do that or something similar on the phone to check if the defined budget makes sense?

    Like
      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      David Johansen in YNAB, the mobile apps, while doing many of the features of the budget, really are still mainly meant for on-the-go category maintenance and spending decisions rather than full budgeting. So no, you can't do that on the phone. Most people do their budgeting on the web app, and use the phone to go, "Do I have enough to buy this Nintendo Switch that is on sale?" and if no, to move money quickly from one category to another so that the Nintendo Switch can be bought. 

      YNAB is one of these things that it is worth going full bore and plunging into. Trying to keep a method from another budgeting system, even if it's a mostly similar system, as Mvelopes is, will often cause frustration. 

      Like 1
    • Sorry, this is less about keeping the old model from Mvelopes and more about being able to manage the budget from the phone. All of the data is there and it should be possible to get a view of all goals and what it takes to fund them each month, so I was just hoping that was possible or people had a recommendation on how to do that in the app on the phone.

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      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      David Johansen Yeah, there's not one on the phone. 

      However, "will my goals fit in my income" is, despite them having created a blog post about it, not really how YNAB's method functions best. It's a nice knock-on to the new software that technically you can do that now if you have goals set on every cateogry, but the YNAB method is "Here's the money I have right now, and here's how much of that money I can afford to set aside for each of these things I care about being able to spend on." The goals are really just to speed up setting aside money for some of those categories, and they actually cause some problems if you set them aside for every category without regard to how you'll use that category. So that's why I made the comment about it being easier to just let go of other budgeting methods wholesale. It's best to just jump in with both feet and not try to make YNAB fit whatever you've been doing before--if you're used to thinking "here's how much I'll make this month and does my plan fit within that" you'll probably want to tweak that a little bit to get the most out of YNAB with the least frustration. 

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    • Is there a tutorial video or article describing that? Because honestly, I'm not seeing how it doesn't devolve into chaos of always just putting out fires (i.e. paying my current bills) instead of having feedback on how both immediate and long term goals are being met.

      Like
      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      @David Johansen

      https://www.youneedabudget.com/the-four-rules/ is where to start. The menu at the top of that page also gives you options to do things like take video courses, sign up for a live webinar, or view 5-20 minute quick start videos to get you going. 

      It's not that you don't plan based on your income and based on what you know is coming in, but it's that going "I make x therefore I will budget y" is often the wrong road to start going down. A YNAB budget is meant to be extremely flexible. You'll know you're meeting your long term goals because money for those goals will be building up in the relevant categories. If it's not, you've made an unrealistic budget. And the true nirvana is budgeting a month at a time with a whole month's worth of money. That's how YNAB answers the "does the budget fit within my income" question: you get all your income first, and budget it out second. 

      Like 1
      • Vibrant
      • No more counting dollars, we'll be counting stars
      • vibrant
      • 2 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      David Johansen The  quick budgeting options - Underfunded, Budgeted Last Month, Spent Last Month, Average Budgeted - are under the lightning bolt icon on mobile. If you select no categories, it will show you the totals for your whole budget, or you can select any combination of one or more categories/category groups to see subtotals. You just have to keep in mind that - as on the full web app - the Underfunded number in particular can be a bit quirky. 

      I do agree with WordTenor that you should stick with the web app for actually allocating new dollars until you all are fully comfortable with the features and limitations of YNAB. But if you really want to see where you are re: budgeted vs goals on mobile, that's where to find it.

      Like 2
      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Vibrant Oooh I learned something new. I knew you can’t select categories without first choosing “edit”; didn’t know the lightning bolt toggled that on.

      Like
    • Vibrant That's the trick I was looking for. Thanks!

      Like 1
  • WordTenor said:
    David Johansen in YNAB, the mobile apps, while doing many of the features of the budget, really are still mainly meant for on-the-go category maintenance and spending decisions rather than full budgeting. So no, you can't do that on the phone.

     Respectfully I disagree with this comment.  Once you have all your goals setup for your budget categories, you can easily using the quick budget button on your phone or tablet to apply your budget in the new month.  I use my phone/tablet all of the time.  You can budget from either interface.  Honestly the only feature I’ve noticed that you cannot do from the web is view overspending - this is more easily seen in the mobile app.  I would definitely recommend setting up tour budget on a tablet or the web version - setting up on your phone will be harder.  

    Like
    • Art That makes sense. Most of what my wife does on her phone is little maintenance things and the ability to quickly make sure that it all "still makes sense" was what I was going for and Vibrant gave me the trick I was looking for. Thanks for the input!

      Like
  • Thank you, this is very helpful! I am a recent convert to YNAB from Mvelopes. The only thing I miss so far is the 'funding plan', because I could play with all the numbers until my amount to be budgeted = 0, and then just hit 'fund'. I liked the ability to shift things around and see how much I had left to play with. I know that the goals are a workaround but it doesn't quite have the same functionality. Other than that, I am loving YNAB. 

    Like
    • Creekside Simplicity Switching from Mvelopes to YNAB has definitely been a big adjustment, but I've found that using Goals as the "funding plan" is a good way to "manage the budget". Then I know that our monthly income has been allocated correctly and the actual budget amounts are the "funding" idea that I'm used to from Mvelopes.

      Like
      • Bruce
      • Software Engineer
      • Bruce
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Creekside Simplicity I think the one feature I miss most (mostly because I've gotten to the point where I'm a month ahead, so I don't need multiple funding plans) is the "sweep" feature, where you could pick a bunch of envelopes and say "Sweep all remaining balances from these into envelope X".  Still can easily be done by selecting the categories you want, and selecting the quick budget Set Available to $0.00, and then moving from TBB to whatever category you need, but I really liked the sweep feature.

      Like 1
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