API?

I understand why it would be a lot of work for you to support auto-importing transactions from non-US banks. 

 

Would you consider providing an API so those imports could be written by others?

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  • Hey there! We are planning to have a public API in the future. Until then, we ask that you don't use our API, because it is not designed for public use, and we make changes to it.
    Stay tuned! :) 

    Reply Like 1
    • Janelle at YNAB About when do you think the API will be complete? There is a new bank coming up in South Africa that also has a public API. Some ninja code will be in order :)

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    • Cadet Blue Griffin no timeline yet, but I'm sure we'll make some big announcements when the time comes :) 

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      • Grummle
      • grummle
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Janelle at YNAB Some kind of timeline (like which year) would be appreciated. Coy answers can be really frustrating. MS VSTS provides a kind of cool timeline which is more a "we are working on X" and "we have X on our timeline" rather then "X will be available March 13th" It allows them to push updates when they are ready too, but gives insight into what they consider important. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/vsts/release-notes/

      Reply Like 1
  • I feel very disappointed with YNAB, especially with the treatment you give to Europeans users, yes, those customers that pay the same as Americans but with the half functionality. I've requested many times the auto import and connect with our banks, and you guys don't even consider it. OK, I can accept that your primary target is US customers (but you don't have problems taking our money, don't you?).

    Now we are requesting that considering that you will never have a connection with Europeans banks, at least, give us an API so we can do it ourselves. Again, the answer is NO or the euphemism that likes to say: "we will do in the future," but meanwhile, we still paying like Americans, or like fools as I see it.

    Not cool YNAB, not cool

    Reply Like 1
      • Herman
      • herman
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Dangior seems the free trial is plenty sufficient for someone to determine if the functionality provides them with enough value to subscribe.  I dont think direct import represents even close to  half the functionality of ynab.  

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      • Dangior
      • dangior
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Herman Manual entry takes more than 80% of the time I spent with YNAB, time that I could dedicate to other stuff. When I tried the free month I wrote you guys a Support ticket, asking about the direct import for European banks, you said you are studying about this. This was more than a year ago. I've assumed you will never do it. At least give us the API so we can do it ourselves

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      • Grummle
      • grummle
      • 1 yr ago
      • Reported - view

      Dangior Me and my wife have found that manual entry is really needed to make YNAB up to date enough to be useful in determining if we can say, eat out tonight. Importing is really good at keeping us up to date if we miss something or for automated bills, but the real usefulness in day to day decisions is in the manual entries. Most banks don't seem to make 'pending' transactions available to third parties via an API.

       

      I've played with pulling data from financial institutions in the past, its a PITA. There are alot, all different, with different security measures and most don't make it easy or charge out right for the privilege of getting your financial data. (Basically banks suck) Many also come with different requirements for 3rd party pulling the data. Things like cyber and physical security requirements for the 3rd party (YNAB). 

       

      My WAG is that YNAB is using a third party clearing house like Plaid or one of the other, older similar clearinghouses. In short they aren't getting the info from the banks directly most likely they are getting it via third party and are paying for the privilege. Contracts with companies like this are costly and if there is one for Europe it wouldn't be cheap. Security requirements for Europe are stricter to I believe. So to understand if it'd make financial sense to them you'd need the break down of their user base and more information then we have. Bright spot is that last I heard there was some talk of requiring all financial institutions in Europe to have API's, but take that with a grain of salt. So yes you could hack together something to pull in the CSV's from your bank, but to provide a decent user experience to a larger audience isn't easy.

       

      Designing a good API that your not going to have to deprecate every 2 months is a gold plated PITA. Especially with an app as in flux as YNAB. I really want it too, but the majority of their user base wouldn't even be able to use it. I'd settle for knowing roughly where on their priority list it lies. 

       

      In short it sounds like something like Mint might fit your needs more. If your only interested in having a static budget that auto imports your transactions and gives you a more retrospective view of your budgeting. 

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  • Jesse did a Reddit AMA and talked more about the API. Pricing and non-US users seemed to be a big topic.

    Jesse AMA

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