TreasuryDirect networth calculation issues - inflow/outflow

I setup linked TreasuryDirect Account.

However, the inflow/outflow are making the assets virtually 0.

inflow: From budget bankAccount to Linked TreasuryAccount

outflow: From Linked TreasuryAccount to buy the security ( t-bill/i-bonds)

With this above transaction, the net becomes zero.

Wonder, how are folks tracking networth for such scenarios.

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  • In general, we don't link tracking accounts. We just update the value at the end of each month or the interval of your choosing. Direct Import doesn't work well with investment accounts.

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 1 mth ago
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      Superbone Personally I update my TD balance on the first of the month, because that's when the interest accrues.  As you said, I don't link my account. But in my case it's a budget account.

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    • nolesrule Since i-saving bonds is used for emergency savings, could you explain your logic of keeping it in budget account. I have a budget Category for treasurydirect outflow, and non-budget Account for tracking networth

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 1 mth ago
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      Sky Blue Harp Let's reverse the question.

      If it's (part of) your Emergency Fund, why would it be a tracking account? My budget categories tell me the purpose of the money, and that includes money dedicated to Income Replacement or other emergencies. The accounts just tell me where the money is. But my categories don't work with money held in tracking accounts, therefore it must be a budget account.

      My budget money is held in checking, savings, CDs, cash in a drawer, cash in my wallet, gift cards. Why should my TD account be any different from any of those?

      My TD account currently holds about 6% of my Budget sum. My Income Replacement category equals about 15% of my Budget sum. Therefore I don't worry about the fact that the bonds purchased within the last 1 year are illiquid, because even that is only 2.6% of my budget at max based on current budget total  (not currently that high because I put monthly I bond purchases on hold for awhile while we were in the process of relocating last year, so I don't have a full year's worth of illiquid bonds right now).

      But I hope you get the idea.

      As for tracking accounts. Mortgage and House, workplace retirement plans, IRAs, HSA and FSA. I also have my taxable investment account on budget but I don't recommend this as something people should do as a general rule unless they really know what they are doing, both in terms of YNAB and in terms of investment risk.

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      • Superbone
      • YNAB convert since 2008
      • Superbone
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      nolesrule Then that's when you should do it. 🙂I don't have a TD account so I wasn't aware of that. The majority of my tracking accounts are invested in the stock market and don't have one interest accruing moment. For these, on the 1st, I update the balance for the last day of the previous month.

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    • nolesrule Thanks , your analysis always makes me think twice. How do you visualize the budget percent breakdown, since the existing reports only shows percentage breakdown of "Spending" by category/payee versus breakdown of "Budgeted" category you mentioned

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 1 mth ago
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      Sky Blue Harp I just pull out a calculator and crunch the numbers. And really with the YNAB API, I could probably do it automatically in Google Sheets. 

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  • Hey Sky Blue Harp ! The data for investment and loan accounts is reported differently (than checking/savings/credit) by financial institutions, so we don't recommend linking those—as Superbone mentioned.

    For investment accounts, these typically have a cash position, and the transactions that are reported to us are the last transaction to hit that cash position. For example, if you make a 401k contribution, that amount is first used to purchase cash in your 401k account, and then that cash position is sold (an outflow) to buy funds. Your financial institution reports that one cash outflow transaction to us, when of course you’d expect to see an inflow.

    I like to handle Tracking Accounts by creating a Scheduled Transaction to show regular contributions or payments, then update the account balance like this monthly (or as often as you'd like).

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