Tips

How much do you tip? We don't go much but a couple times a year. Went to a local place, like a Cracker Barrel or Bob Evans. I reach the check-out to pay, they ask if I tipped at the table, I say no, but that I wanted to tip, they swing around the POS screen (fancy) and I have 3 auto-populated choices and 1 for other. The first choice was 25%. The second choice was 20%. The third choice was 15%. Then there was other, which you filled in a dollar amount, not a percent. Our family meal came a bit over $80. As I mentioned, this doesn't happen often, but the 25% threw me for a surprise.

26replies Oldest first
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Active threads
  • Popular
  • 18%-20% unless service was bad in which case I tip about 15%.

    Reply Like 1
  • I go to a sandwich shop where they flip that screen around to you after ordering at the counter.  This is a place where you order at the counter, go pick up your food at the counter, and then bus your own table. The choices are no tip, 10%, 15%, or 20% but it defaults to 10%! That takes a lot of gall. For this case, I purposely change the choice to no tip as it really bothers me. If they defaulted to no tip, I might throw them 10% every now and then since I like the food there and it's not a chain. But to assume a tip really gets my goat especially at a place where they don't service you in any way other than making your food.

    Reply Like 2
  • But yeah, I'm a good tipper and almost always tip at least 20% when serviced at a restaurant.

    Reply Like
    • Ben
    • Toolkit for YNAB Designer & Developer
    • furiousfalcon
    • 2 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Roughly 15-20% if I go to a sit down place which provides service. Usually zero for fast food or similar where I'm picking up from a window/order from a counter and there's really no service needed.

    Reply Like
  • 20% for being served at a table. $1-2 for take-out

    Reply Like 1
  • I always tip 20% (usually rounded up) unless the service was absolutely horrible, then I tip around 15%. I hate that the waiter depends on my tip for their pay, but 25% is really pushing it in my opinion.

    Reply Like
  • 15-20%  of the pre-tax amount depending on rounding for table service. It usually ends up in the 16-18% range. I tend to go 20% for service that anticipates our needs. Bad service gets 10%.

    I don't do tip jars. I have no idea who actually gets that money. The owner could just be pocketing it, whereas formal tips have to be passed on to the employees. I also am always confused by takeout service. They talk about the server putting it together, but really it's just a different method of plating the food (done by the line cooks) and putting it in a bag.

    Now, screwing up orders entirely they get one chance to correct it and on the second attempt if it's still wrong we just leave the food on the table and walk out after letting the manager know... after all our time has been wasted too. That's only happened twice.

    I would prefer eliminating the tipping culture, as I find it awkward.

    Reply Like
  • You know the old joke:  what's the difference between a Canadian and a canoe?  A canoe tips occasionally. Pa-dum-pum!

    Well, I'm a Canadian that always tips. 🙂  Usually 18-20% of pre-tax amount rounded up or down to the nearest whole dollar.  But sometimes even 20% feels cheap to me, especially when it's just me and my mom (and she doesn't eat very much) and we've been very well served. When it's just me and my mom, eating a meal (not a coffee stop),  and we're well served, I use 20% or $10 ($5/person served), whichever is the most.

    Reply Like
  • 10 % maybe a bit more if they were amazing. I’m really surprised you all tip so high. Maybe an American (Canadian!) v Europe thing?

    Reply Like
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      lindsay_g  federal minimum wage in the US for servers is $2.13/hr as opposed to $7.25/hr for everyone else. 

      Reply Like
      • monkeyhanger
      • No animals were harmed
      • monkeyhanger.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      lindsay_g Yep, 10% max here too (UK) and I think it is to do with wages.

      When I lived in Australia in the late 90s/early 00s I was firmly told not to tip as they paid their waiting staff properly. Sometimes it was the waiting staff telling me. When I last visited 5 years ago, tipping seemed to have become the norm there too but not at massive levels.

      Reply Like
      • Ben Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      lindsay_g I tip about the same. 

      Reply Like
      • Ben Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      jenmas my state's min. for tipped workers is about 4.20, not a huge difference.

      Reply Like
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 2 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      Ben Khaki Storm That $3.05 difference is in fact a huge difference from $7.25/hr - it's 72% in fact. That's $6,344/yr if someone manages to get 40hrs/week. Tipping 10% in the US is terrible.

      Reply Like 3
      • monkeyhanger
      • No animals were harmed
      • monkeyhanger.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      jenmas In the UK, waiting staff have the same minimum wage as everyone else.  The young are a bit screwed though and they predominate amongst waiting staff.

      https://www.squirepattonboggs.com/en/insights/publications/2018/10/new-uk-national-living-and-minimum-wage-rates-from-1-april-2019

      There's also a big debate here that the national minimum wage is below what should be considered a national living wage.

      It's intriguing to a Brit that customers in the US are essentially required to bring someone's salary up to an acceptable level rather than the business owners. I know the customer would pay the same overall if prices were increased to cover a decent wage but I grew up with a tip only being for exceptional service so it feels off for my cultural norms. It's now become more normal and is often added onto a bill (although you can choose for it to be taken off) but I guess I still see things through that lens.

      Thanks for that info though for when I next visit the US. Knowing how much to tip in places is a cultural minefield.

      Reply Like
      • Ben Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      jenmas I meant the 2.15 to 4.20 my state min, wasn't a huge difference. 

      Reply Like
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Ben Khaki Storm It's a 97% difference in that case.

      Reply Like
      • lindsay_g
      • Beige_Banjo.3
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      jenmas Woah, that’s insane. Okay, in the US I would tip high. That is appalling.

      As a young person I did lots of bar jobs and waiting tables. Everywhere I worked we shared the tips fairly. That certainly wasn’t true of all companies though.

      When I tip I either put cash in the hand of the person, or at least discuss with them how the money is split. If the waiter is happy for me to add something to my bank card payment I just do that.

      Reply Like
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Ben Khaki Storm *10%*?! I don't think 10% was ever an acceptable tip level in my lifetime in the US, and I'm pretty long in the tooth at this point.

      Reply Like 1
      • Ben Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      jenmas I'll try to be clearer because that's still not what I was referring to. Also, on the subject, when I taught a budgeting class about 20 yrs ago (yes dated and yes small sample, just it is a sample) the wait staff in class had more money to budget than I did working full-time after college. And, no their cash tips weren't reported, so tax free. I'm just saying I didn't ask where the money came from, just how they managed their spending. 

      Reply Like
      • Ben Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      bevocat it's better than no tip. 

      Reply Like
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Ben Khaki Storm I think your saying that your state's wage for tipped workers isn't that much higher than the federal rate. I'm saying it's almost double. Still not high, certainly not a living wage, but almost double is a bit of a BFD.

      Reply Like
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 2 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      Ben Khaki Storm I disagree. If you can't afford a suitable tip, stay home and let the staff serve someone else who does provide a suitable tip.

      Reply Like 3
  • I'm curious who is pushing the idea that 18% is the new 15%. I get that the minimum wage for tipped workers is generally stagnant, but prices are rising with inflation, which means the tips do as well.

    The real travesty is that minimum wage is not a livable wage.

    Reply Like 2
  • *In the US*

    Having worked in a restaurant before and having to rely on tips for income, I feel the pain of the wait staff. Also, generally the server themselves does not keep the whole tip. At the end of the night they give % to hostess, bus boys, bar tenders and kitchen expo (what we called the person who gathers the meals, makes sure you get your extra ranch dressing on the side, etc). Credit card tips get automatically taxed and cash tips get claimed at the end of the night (or are supposed to anyway 😉).

    I generally give 18-20% unless the service was terrible then I give 15%, I have rarely encountered a situation where I had service so bad I needed to tip less. If I get a drink at a bar that is a beer or wine, literally just pouring in a glass, I do $1 per drink. For counter service where I just get the food and sit down (like Moe's) I don't usually tip unless the people went out of their way to be nice while making my food. For take out, I give a few $ because yes, someone still did take their time to make sure you got your extra ranch dressing and silverware. 

    Reply Like 2
  • This system is common with the newest POS checkout systems.  I see it everywhere with varying defaults.   

    Reply Like 1
Like Follow
  • 2 mths agoLast active
  • 26Replies
  • 191Views
  • 13 Following