Overspent in <previous month> numbers don't add up...

I'm hoping this is a very stupid question, with a very easy answer!

I just switched to start using nYNAB (been using YNAB 4 for a long time).  I started fresh online, pulled in my existing accounts (including credit cards with balances, etc.).  I got everything budgeted, transactions and balances up to date, etc.  But, now I'm seeing something odd in the monthly budget at the top of the screen, and it's confusing me.

For example, in March, I see the first budget (the green budget picture).  I have everything balanced, and have $0.00 overspent in February.  Everything balances out at $0.00.  But if I go into the April budget (with the red budget), it says I've overspent by $9.64 in March.

I'm confused as to how that can be the case, when it clearly shows that  everything's properly balanced for March, but yet April thinks that March is overspent by $9.64.

Am I missing something obvious?  Where does it pull this number from, and think that I'm overspending?  Does it have to do with the fact that I just started this month, and the numbers are skewed?  I wouldn't think so, since I have to account for that $9.64 somewhere, but I don't know what to do with it to make it balanced out!  Ugh!

Thanks for the help!

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  • Look for any categories in March with a red negative balance.

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    • nolesrule That's the confusing thing, there aren't any.  (Well, there's one category with a negative balance, that was purchased on a credit card.  But it's a $3,000 purchase, not a $9.00 purchase.  I'm so confused!

      So, somewhere in there it's telling me I have $9.64 that I need to budget, but then in April it says that I've overspent by $9.64.  What the crud?

      Like
    • So, I guess I'm an idiot.

      The way credit cards work on nYNAB is confusing, and will take some getting used to.  In this case, I had $2,993.51 on Household, that wasn't budgeted.  But that's because it was purchased on a credit card, using funds that weren't budgeted.  However, I was confused where it was only showing I was ~$9.00 that I needed to budget and deal with, rather than the entire $2,993; at which point I realized that I had another split transaction elsewhere on a debit card that had $9 on it to go to the same Households category.

      So yeah, it had to do with an overbudget category, but then it was treated as though I needed to budget it (with a green indicator, which made me think it was extra money I had somewhere).  Again, I'm sure it all makes sense if you've used nYNAB for long enough, but for just switching to it from YNAB4, it's definitely throwing me for a loop.  :(

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      • nolesrule
      • Stealing From the Future fix is an improvement but is incomplete....
      • nolesrule
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Lavender Drill The red color for the category means that at least some of the overspending was in a cash-based account, and if there's a mix of CC and cash overspending, it means the overspending exceeded the amount that was put on the credit card.

      That's why I said to look for a red category in my previous post.

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    • Ah, that makes sense.  I did notice that once I budgeted a few $$s to cover the cash/debit card portion of that category, it turned from red to orange.

      Is it safe then to assume that if it's red, you've underbudgeted somewhere, but if it's orange, it means that it's at least covered by a credit card?

      Just trying to figure this all out, alongside an active cutover to nYNAB from YNAB4! I've watched a number of videos and read documentation on nYNAB, but some of the small nuance changes still escape me. 

      Thanks!

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      • Jeff Reetz
      • Electrical Engineer
      • jefflilj
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Lavender Drill 

      i look at red color as you have over spent with actual cash that you have and better make sure you have the cash to cover it or you may get an over draft fee  

      Orange i look at as overspent with a credit card.  If not budgeted for them you are living on credit card float. The goal would be to get off of credit card float. 

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  • Yeah, I'm definitely making it my goal now to not live on general credit card float month to month.  We've struggled with that in the past, and are making it our goal to not do that any longer....

     

    ...however!  The one thing that goes against that is the NFM card.  NFM always runs promotions that allow you for X-months of interest-free financing depending on what you buy.  We usually always have a revolving account with them with one or two interest-free items on them (refrigerator, washer/dryer, laptop, etc.).  It's one of those things that we may need right away, or want to get, and logically makes more sense to get it right away and budget aside for while paying it off (interest free), vs. setting aside the money and not having it, and then paying for it with cash at the end.  Ultimately, the cash we set aside is the same either way, but by taking advantage of the interest free credit through them, it allows us the ability to get it right away, instead of saving to then get down the road.

    But as long as I understand that "orange" means" overspend sitting on a credit card", and as long as I don't allow myself to sit on debt on an interest-bearing account, I think I can get a good feel for how that all works together!

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      • nolesrule
      • Stealing From the Future fix is an improvement but is incomplete....
      • nolesrule
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Lavender Drill It's a zero interest loan, but it's still a loan. You make the assumption that you'll have the money when you need it to make the payments What happens if you're wrong? It becomes a high interest purchase instead.

      Even if you take advantage of the zero interest promotion, you should still save up in your budget before you make the purchase.

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    • nolesrule Yeah, don't get me wrong.  I'm not advocating spending money that I'm not guaranteed to have down the road.  In my case, I do have the money in my account.  But it's nice to have the freedom to invest and use the cash elsewhere, while having the zero-interest promotion (and monthly budgeting that money to put towards the card to make sure I don't fall behind on the card and run into issues that way)!   

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      • nolesrule
      • Stealing From the Future fix is an improvement but is incomplete....
      • nolesrule
      • 3 yrs ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Lavender Drill I'm not getting you wrong. Using the money in some other category or investing it is giving your money more than one job. In an allocation budget system, that's a no no. It's a violation of the first rule of YNAB.

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    • nolesrule I'm not going to continue to debate that with you. You helped to resolve where I had the missing $9.00 at.  Thank you for your help in that.

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      • nolesrule
      • Stealing From the Future fix is an improvement but is incomplete....
      • nolesrule
      • 3 yrs ago
      • Reported - view

      Lavender Drill 🍺

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    • @nolesrule  Here here! 🍺🍺

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  • 3 yrs agoLast active
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