Where to start?

Hello So I am very new to YNAB, I find visual learning easier rahter than having to read text in a screen.  Are their some complete beginner videos to help me get started?

 

Cheers

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  • Here is a link to the classes. https://www.youneedabudget.com/classes/

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  • This video is one of the very best:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tACY3ge6VdA

    Ignore the title; it's great whether or not you're broke.

    Reply Like 1
  • Hi Sky Blue Hail ! Welcome to You Need A Budget!

    If you prefer a visual, I recommend signing up for our Learn the Four Rules workshop, because YNAB’s Four Rules are at the heart of everything we do.

    With the four rules in hand, you’ll be ready to set up your budget, take control of your money and reach your financial goals. It’s the perfect foundation to build your budget on! Our amazing teachers will take good care of you. 😀

    You’ll want to start YNAB with the money you have on hand today – and prioritize those dollars. Here's a short video that explains these three main steps:

    1. Add your primary accounts with the balances as of today.

    2. Budget those dollars where they’re needed before you get paid again.

    3. Record your spending as it happens, and reconcile regularly so you can always trust your budget!

    Let us know if you have any questions!

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  • I really benefited from the Nick True videos

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  • I recommend the YNAB youtube site. https://www.youtube.com/user/YouNeedABudget. There are recordings of classes, whiteboard Wednesdays, and even a sound track. Lots of good information to check out. Doing a YNAB search shows up many more.

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  • After reading the book, I posted links on another thread that parallel the book sections: https://support.youneedabudget.com/t/k9wcwn/ynab-book

    I'd recommend going over that content before diving into the software too much. The book took me two evenings after dinner to read, and the links are more condensed than the book content. 

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  • Thanks for the tips I will have to spend some time trying to understand this all.

    Just playing devlis advocate here but I could easily download and use a cashflow forcast template in Excel and save my self the yearly subscription. I logged a ticket with support and they have advised me to delete next months budget and to only work on this months budget.  It seems very labour intensive. 

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 2 mths ago
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      • Louie
      • YNAB Newbie
      • Louie
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Sky Blue Hail Honestly I used to do something like that in Quicken. What I found was that there were always items I forgot to include, and at least for me (it may be me, I never really spent the time to master Quicken), there wasn't an easy way to set money aside for things in the manner of putting cash in an envelope (ala YNAB). YNAB is a bit counter intuitive at first. But what I got from YNAB that I never got from spreadsheets (and I am a CPA believe it or not) nor from quicken, was the visibility into all of my activity. I never imported transactions from from my credit cards and categorized them. I guess you could do this with a spreadsheet, but to me it seems a LOT easier to do in YNAB. As soon as I did this I noticed I was spending a lot more on things like coffee than I thought I was. I was able to cut my coffee consumption enough this month alone to pay for a year long subscription to YNAB. The other nice thing YNAB has done for me was to allow me to get a much clearer picture of my total net worth. I added my mortgage (thankfully my only debt), my various 401(K) other retirement plans, and other investments into one place, in tracking accounts. I was kind of surprised at what my net worth is (had been under estimating it), and never had this view before. Again, I probably could have done this with a spreadsheet, but it is so much easier in YNAB, especially the monthly updates.

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    • Louie Yeah I do get that I think it is a bit easier if you are US based there is no support for UK banks so we have to enter are data manually however I do find YNAB very user-friendly.  Are there any plans to add support for UK banks?  There really is no excuse not to these days I use Starling bank whcih are one of the new Open Banking Banks and have direct API's just for this purpose.

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      • Louie
      • YNAB Newbie
      • Louie
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Sky Blue Hail So are you saying you can't set up your UK bank as an unlinked account and then download transactions in one of the compatible file formats? That's what I do just because I don't want to share my banking passwords with anyone else (sorry YNAB, I am not trusting that way), and in a manual download you kind of have to review the imported transactions at the time....it tends to enforce a consistency discipline for me.

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      • Louie
      • YNAB Newbie
      • Louie
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Sky Blue Hail FYI, Sterling bank now supports exporting statements in CSV format. This may work for importing data to YNAB, versus entering transactions manually. https://www.starlingbank.com/blog/new-features-bring-better-banking/

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  • How's going with the learning?

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  • Slowly I'll stick with it. 

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      • Ben Khaki Storm
      • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
      • Khaki_Storm.1
      • 2 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Sky Blue Hail Great decision! Like exercise, it takes time to build up stamina and speed. You'll get there :) 

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