Purposely allowing for Overspending, to help keep your budget

My family and I are financially secure, but we're using YNAB to help with budgeting, so that we can really focus on saving/investing.  Our situation allows us to cover all of our expenses...but herein lies the problem.  Let's say we want to put away $700/mo for vacation.  That works great, once you're saved up, but we're new to YNAB, so let's say we've only put away $1400 (in YNAB)(we've been using it for 2 months), and we decide to go on a $3000 vacation.  We're going to overspend that category.  YNAB wants me to budget more money to cover this expense.  I want to keep a negative balance on that account to show that we've already overspent that category, and we need to rebuild a balance before we take another vacation.  

Is this against "best practices"?  It seems like what will happen is, when the month rolls over, YNAB will automatically try to "balance" the negative vacation account to $0.  I want to keep the negative balance (-$1600), budget my normal $700/mo, and carry on.  Slowly working up a vacation budget.  I think YNAB wants me to cover the spending in the current month, in which case, I'm not learning....I'm just using my extra income to overspend, and then erasing the overspending and immediately budgeting more money to that category.

How do you guys handle this?  Does carrying a negative balance in the "Vacation" line erase your "age of money"?

Thank you for your help

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  • YNAB is an allocation budget system with functionality designed to promote and support the method (Read about the YNAB method and the 4 Rules). It means every dollar you have is given a job, and one job only. When you have overspending in a category, it means you have given your dollars more than one job because you have spent money from other categories, but you just chose not to update YNAB.

    If you don't fix the overspending by the end of the month, YNAB will force-fix it for you as a last resort but the expectation is for you to fix it yourself. If it's cash overspending, it will reduce what you have available to budget in the next month. If it's credit card overspending, you won't have money reserved to make the payment.

    So you need to just be honest. You spent money on vacations that you had earmarked in your budget for something else.  You prioritized spending money in a category that didn't have enough in it over spending money in a category that had enough. You made your priority decision. Now make your budget reflect those priorities. Move the money to cover the overspending.

    Reply Like 9
  • Sounds like you can cover it from your other categories, so cover it from your other categories. The program doesn't care. It's not there to judge you, so there's no sense in lying to yourself about it. Reduce other categories to cover the overspending and then rest assured that your category balances will give you accurate information to guide your spending decisions.

    Reply Like 3
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      bevocat Thank you for replying, but I think you missed the point.  I'm aware that I can cover the expense, and that no one is judging me.  I'm trying to keep track of the overspending, so that at the end of the year, I have not gone over budget in the vacation category.  If YNAB does not keep track of the overspending for me, from month to month, and I continue to fund the category with other categories....I'm not really budgeting....I'm just spending money and assigning it to accounts.

      Reply Like
      • mamster
      • mamster
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      gooded When you let a category go negative, you're still taking money from another category (because the money has to come from somewhere); you're just not being transparent or intentional about which one. Explicitly moving money will lead to better outcomes than the approach you describe, because (a) it forces you to confront your spending priorities, and (b) lets you capitalize on the feeling of scarcity. Taking money out of the other categories feels bad, doesn't it? That's a good thing! It means you really have to stop and think, not just let a category go red and say, "I'll deal with it later."

      You probably don't need a reminder to refill the category you borrowed from. You will be looking at your budget regularly, and if a category is underfunded, you'll probably just know. This is real budgeting. For those where it's not so obvious (such as annual premiums), use a reminder in the category name, note field, or a separate to-do list app.

      Finally: Your question gets asked a lot. Both YNAB itself and the community have really thought through the pros and cons of being able to leave categories overspent. And the cons vastly outweigh the pros. 

      Reply Like 2
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      mamster Thank you.  I don't really want to leave it overspent.  I want to make sure I don't overfund my Vacation category.  If I make a conscious decision to spend the money early...I'm not upset with myself.  But at the end of 12 months, I want to make sure I didn't go over my annual budget.  I'm looking for a way to make sure I don't just keep putting $700/mo into a category that was overspent last month.  adriana01  had a good solution below.  If you have a better idea, I would love to hear it.  Thanks again.

      Reply Like 1
      • mamster
      • mamster
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      gooded You're thinking about things in a forecast budget way, not an allocation budget way.

      You spent a bunch on Vacation this month. Fine! You had the money to cover it from other categories. Next month you're going to get your paycheck and sit down and look at your categories and your TBB balance. Maybe some of your categories are lower than you'd like because of your vacation spending in March. Great, prioritize them. Now you probably have less to allocate to Vacation.

      There's little to gain from thinking in terms, "I need to fund this category less in the future because I spent more on it today." That's arbitrary. It has nothing to do with your goals and responsibilities, unless one of your goals is "Budget less money for vacation," which is probably no one's goal. Depending on how things go over the rest of the year, you might end up budgeting less for vacation, or not. As long as you're working within your means and your priorities, it's fine.

      Or, put another way, if you want to deemphasize vacation, what is it you want to prioritize instead? Is it categories you moved money from to cover the most recent vacation? Is it debt repayment? Retirement savings? Think in terms of what you want/need to prioritize, not what to deemphasize.

      Reply Like 2
  • One way to make yourself see the effects of taking money from a well-funded category to cover a large overspend elsewhere might be to rename your categories:

    Vacation (Not funding until EF is back to 10k, then 700/mth due to big Vacation)

    and

    EF (1000/mth until 10k then 300, extra due to big Vacation)

    (Or whatever categories you had to use to cover the extra)

    Reply Like 3
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      adriana01 Thank you.  This is a good idea.  It sounds like YNAB does not have a great way to handle this.  Your method sounds like a good "work around".  I may have to try this.  I was just hoping there was a more straightforward method, built into the software.  Thank you.

      Reply Like
      • adriana01
      • adriana01
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      gooded one of the key points to keep in mind about YNAB is that it is an allocation budget. It is designed to build a budget based on the money you have now, and that means (as someone said elsewhere in the forum), "the money's gotta come from somewhere".

      If you intend to spend 8400 a year on vacations, but spend 3000 when you had only saved up 1400, the other 1600 had to come from either somewhere else in your budget or it was a new debt (possibly a balance on a credit card). Either way, it's better to make your budget reflect reality than to have your money counted against two categories.

      Reply Like 2
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      adriana01 Thank you.  Yes, I think this is an important point that I need to absorb.  nolesrule made a similar point above, and I think I'm finally started to get it.  I'm assuming your "EF" abbreviation meant Emergency Fund.  And that's exactly that I'm doing... I have a large balance in my Emergency Fund, and when I overspend, I just cover the expense with my emergency fund.  And that's the thing....I'm not learning much, if I keep allowing myself to do this.  I guess it will be a matter of self discipline (which I think I have a lot of).  

      Let's look at it this way though.  In March, I'm making a conscious decision to overspend my Vacation Category.  I want to take my family on a ski vacation, and I won't be able to do this once the snow is gone.  So I decide I'll overspend my Vacation category.  I understand, the money has to come from somewhere, so I "borrow" from my Emergency Fund.  But now, how do I keep track of the fact that I've overspent?  You had the idea of renaming the categories.  That makes sense, but seems cumbersome.  My goal is to continue to fund the category with $700/mo, but I want to pay back the "loan" I took from my emergency fund, before I start to accrue a balance.

      Any ideas?

      Reply Like
      • Alex
      • ottobot
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      gooded Try making a goal in your emergency fund of a certain amount to hit that $1600 overspend! You can still put in your $700 a month, but try to add a little more for the next few months to reach it.

      Reply Like
      • adriana01
      • adriana01
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      gooded if you use a monthly goal you can adjust that for each category. I would remove any goal I had on Vacation and change EF to be target (current balance + 3 months funding) by 3 months from now.

      Renaming categories is not difficult, but if I were doing it in YNAB instead of as a way to explain I might have done something like

      🛑 Vacation (0/mth A&M,500 J, 700)

      ⚠️EF (1000/mth A&M, 500 J, 300)

      if I needed to make the adjustments in April & May. I could probably make it even simpler if I wanted.

      Reply Like 2
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      adriana01 This seems like the best idea I've heard yet.  Thank you.  I think I will try this.  With a slight change.  My EF is really just my "cushion".  It's where I put the leftover funds from "to be budgeted".  So I don't really budget money to/from the EF....It just catches whatever is leftover at the end of the month.

      My real objective with this question was, "how do I make sure I don't over-fund my Vacation category on an annual basis?"  If I change my Category Name as you suggested:

      Vacation (0/mth A&M,500 J, 700)

      That should solve the problem of overfunding the category.

      Thank you for helping me through this.  I appreciate it.

      Reply Like 3
      • Agent99
      • Working to Get Smart at budgeting, finances and life
      • Agent99.1
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

        gooded There was a way to handle this perfectly in the prior version of the software, which I still use.  So what you are saying/thinking makes total sense.  However, I will say that the advice given here is good and should be considered.    But I just wanted to say "I totally get what you were asking; it's sad the current version of the software can't work with you."

      Reply Like 2
  • I think you bring up a very good point. It's something that I've been struggling with actually. 

    For instance for this year, my goal is to save $4,000 for vacation. But that will be used for multiple trips. As I spend money from the category, YNAB subtracts It from the goal and then tells me I need to save more to make up the goal. 

    There's no real way to track a goal that will not be replenished as you spend. 

    For now, I use my Financial Wellness Spreadsheet to track this. Not sure is anyone else has any other ideas.

    Reply Like
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Captain Taniele As I'm starting to get a better idea of how we're supposed to be using YNAB, I have an idea for you. 

      Get rid of the goal.  Budget $333.33/mo ($4,000/12)to your Vacation budget.  Spend the money after you accrue a balance.  Then you know you're only spending $4,000 per year.

      I'm not sure this is what everyone will agree on, but this is my understanding of how we're supposed to be using YNAB.

      Reply Like 1
      • adriana01
      • adriana01
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      gooded you can also have a goal to budget 333.33 a month if that is the average monthly amount to reach your goal. I find that works best when I will be spending out of the category

      Reply Like 2
    • gooded That's a good idea except my income is highly variable. For instance, this past month I put $1,500 in the vacation category but in April, I'll only be able to able to cover my basic living expenses. 

      The monthly option doesn't really take that into account unfortunately. So if I don't find it on month it won't make not of that the following month. Or if I over fund it one month it won't tell me I need to budget less. 

      I suppose I could go in and adjust the goal every month but that seems cumbersome.

      Reply Like 1
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Captain Taniele Spreadsheets are good for this, as you pointed out. I keep one for my participation in the Savings Challenge, with all my budget categories and how much I want to save per month so if I forget I can just refer to the SS. And when my priorities change, it's easy for me to adjust and see how I want to change future months to still achieve my goals. For example, this month, almost a quarter into the year, I decided to scrap all my plans I'd laid out in the Savings Challenge and throw everything at my income replacement fund. Now that it's minimally funded, I can shift focus to my home repair categories (my myriad, myriad home repair categories! 😂) and I've got my spreadsheet to tinker with how I want to start building those back up again.

      For me, changing goals in YNAB as needed doesn't feel cumbersome to me, but then I actually love playing with my budget. For everyone else, there's an easier workaround of just using a spreadsheet.

      Reply Like 1
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      bevocat Thank you.  I think this is another good point.  I've been wanting YNAB to handle everything....but maybe I do need a spreadsheet or two, to keep track of some of these "quirky" problems.  I understand YNAB can't have easy methods to handle every situation.  Sometimes I may need to create a spreadsheet to keep track of my special circumstances.

      Reply Like 2
    • bevocat I think I'll always have my spreadsheets. I rather enjoy them. 😁

      This thread has given me a better idea of how to manage my spreadsheets, which really is forecasting, by using the allocation formula that YNAB teaches. 

      I still think you need to have both. Maybe this will change later but for now this is how I see it. 

      For example, I want to max out both my 401k and my IRA this year. Rolling with the punches means one month I may decide to fund another category instead of these. I still want to be able to go back later and know I need to make up or prioritize those accounts down the line if I want to be on track. 

      Similarly with my vacation example, I only want to spend $4k this year. If I decide to book a cheap weekend trip somewhere that I wasn't planning on, I could say oh well, my priorities changed and just keep funding that account. Or I could say ok I spent that extra money there so now I have less to spend on other trips down the road. 

      Certainly priorities do change but I think it's important to hold ourselves accountable. It could be very easy to use the idea of changing priorities to use money in ways we didn't intend to. While sometimes that is necessary, there will be other times when it is not and we're just going on impluse. 

      To that end my solution for my vacation fund example is this. As adriana01 and gooded suggested, I'll get rid of the total goal. Instead I'll do a monthly funding goal. So if it's $4,000 as a whole and I've already saved $1,500, my new monthly goal for the next 9 months will be $277.78 per month. 

      If I'm able to add more or less than that next month I'll adjust the monthly funding goal so I never fund over $4,000. I added a note to the details page with the total I want to add to that category for the year. Once I spend money from the category I'll also not the total spent here. I'll use that as my reference. 

      I think this will help me to keep my overall priorities straight while only allocating the funds that I have on hand.

      Reply Like 2
      • sgarelick
      • sgarelick
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Captain Taniele Would creating a separate category for each vacation you want to take solve the problem. Once you've taken one of the vacations, you could move any remaining money that specific budget line item somewhere else and then hide that specific vacation category from your budget. It's more categories to deal with but each trip becomes it's own savings fund/goal.

      Reply Like 1
  • I might try to pull money from other categories in order to correct the balance. Then you can set a goal in your vacation category to hit either your "overspent" amount of $1600 to reallocate OR make your next goal even higher to avoid the initial overspending.

    YNAB doesn't let you overspend in a category and pay it back later, which I've found can be frustrating if you're waiting on someone else to pay you back or you plan on using money from the next month. I think the whole point is to make sure you're taking into account your overspending so you know where your money is going. I hope you can find a solution!

    Reply Like 1
  • gooded said:
    Let's say we want to put away $700/mo for vacation.  That works great, once you're saved up, but we're new to YNAB, so let's say we've only put away $1400 (in YNAB)(we've been using it for 2 months), and we decide to go on a $3000 vacation. 

     $700 per month may be an appropriate accrual for your Vacation category, but how much should it have had in it when you started using YNAB?  If you intended to take a $3000 vacation 2 months after starting YNAB, and intended to accrue $700 per month for vacations, the initial balance of your Vacation category should have been $1600 before accruing that first month.  This would represent money put aside for vacation (probably not consciously) before starting YNAB.

    One of the nice things about an allocation budget is that it puts purpose on your savings.  You might have $10,000 in a savings account; but how much is really an emergency fund, and how much is really accrual for expenses that don't happen every month?  With YNAB, you live by the categories.  So you can see that you needed $1600 of that $10K for Vacation, and maybe $2K or $3K for various other things, so you actually have much less of a true emergency fund than you were thinking.   For example, suppose you have a property tax bill of $3000 per year.  You need to accrue $250 per month, right?  But if the bill is due in September and you start YNAB in February, you won't have built up $3000 by the time the bill comes due.  The category should have had some money in it when you set up the original budget.

    Don't feel bad about missing this.  It's something that no new budgeters figure out the first time.  If you end up reworking your budget in a major way and doing a fresh start, you have a decent chance of setting up a new budget this way on your 2nd or 3rd try; but the first budget is a major learning experience.  Failing to fund the categories as they needed to be on Day Ones doesn't make you a failure.  But when you put the money into the categories where it belongs, that gives clarity as to what your actual financial position is.

    In your position, I'd simply move $1600 from the emergency fund category to Vacation, continue to accrue Vacation at $700 per month, and not take any more vacations that aren't already budgeted.  Meanwhile, build the emergency fund back up to whatever level you need for peace of mind.

    This will feel chaotic and like you're moving backwards for a few months, until you go through an entire cycle of your normal non-monthly expenses and get those categories funded at the levels where they belong.  After you get through that cycle, you'll have many fewer incidents of having to take money from the e-fund to cover a category that should have had more money in it when you started YNAB.

    Reply Like 7
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Patzer This is perfect.  Thank you.  I agree with you 100%.  This makes total sense for the situation I described (which, by the way, is a made up scenario).

      Now, let's take it one step further....  Let's say I've been using YNAB for 14 months, and a similar scenario happens.  I decide to take a vacation that I haven't fully funded yet.  I make a conscious decision to overspend my Vacation Category.  I understand, the money has to come from somewhere, so I "borrow" from my Emergency Fund.  But now, how do I keep track of the fact that I've overspent?  My goal is to continue to fund the Vacation category with $700/mo, but I want to pay back the "loan" I took from my emergency fund, before I start to accrue a balance.

      Any ideas?  Do I need to create a Spreadsheet outside of YNAB?  adriana01 had a solution, above, but I'm still hoping for something that's built into YNAB.

      Thank you for your help.

      Reply Like
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 5
      • Reported - view

      Patzer I guess I need to look at the budget differently.  I'm looking at it as an annual budget.  But I guess I need to save for the event before I spend the money.  I think I'm understanding now.  There isn't a way to handle this....because YNAB does not believe this is something you should do.  I will need to re-think how I look at my budget.  It may mean budgeting a lump sum, like you mentioned.    I still like to hear any ideas you have....but I think I'm realizing that I need to change the way I'm looking at things.

      Thanks again.

      Reply Like 5
      • Patzer
      • Retired at age 60. Thank you, YNAB!
      • Patzer
      • 8 mths ago
      • 5
      • Reported - view

      gooded

      Paying back an overspent category is a null concept in YNAB.  It's just not part of the system.

      If you want to regard that $1600 as "on loan" from other categories until it's paid back, that's all on you to devise a workaround that meets this need.  YNAB won't help you with anything automatic.

      To be fair, I do things like this.  Extended example:  I have an HSA that is off budget.  HSA contributions are a budgeted expense.  Through March, I spent all of the medical category on my HSA contributions.  Then I decided to open an HSA with a different custodian for a better deal.  I can transfer the accounts, but there is a noticeable time lag and a period of frozen access.  Meanwhile, I need to occasionally use the HSA to pay for medical expenses.

      So what did I do? I moved $1000 from my Unexpected Expenses category to Medical, and used that to fund the newly opened HSA.  Once I had my debit card for the new HSA, I started the transfer process and I'm no longer concerned with the time lag.  $1000 will cover any out of pocket medical expenses I have before the funds transfer.

      Meanwhile, in the budget, my Unexpected Expenses category is below its target level.  Building it back to its target level becomes a priority.  I also need to budget $1000 less to Medical over the rest of the year, because I cannot contribute more than the legal maximum to the HSA.  So I write myself category notes for Medical detailing the numbers, and I just know I need to build Unexpected Expenses back up to the target level.  More formally, it would be possible to do my initial budget each month, then move money from Medical to Unexpected Expenses until the latter is where it belongs; but in reality, I am likely to find extra money to throw at Unexpected Expenses.  That extra money makes the "pay back" mode less useful.

      Reply Like 5
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 8 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Patzer said:
      Paying back an overspent category is a null concept in YNAB.  It's just not part of the system.

      That may be the key right there. You don't pay back the overspent category.

      If you want to ensure that you don't exceed spending in the category on an annual basis, use reports to check your spending. 

      Reply Like 1
      • adriana01
      • adriana01
      • 8 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      gooded the "built into YNAB" method is to either cover the overspending with existing money or create new debt, and then adjust your priorities as needed. How you track what your priorities are is up to you, but in YNAB you can use the category title, goals of some sort, or category notes. I find category title & goals most useful. Sometimes, though, I just acknowledge that my priority changed & move on rather than make grand schemes to "make up for" an overspent category.

      Reply Like
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 8 mths ago
      • 4
      • Reported - view

      gooded In the summer of 2017 I bought a house on a whim. I mean not exactly, but close enough - I very quickly moved from conceiving the idea of buying rental property in April to making an offer in June (I bought a rental property that was priced right and already had a tenant). But I needed to raid some categories to get the cash for my down payment. I don't use goals. However, I could tell at a glance that my Hawaii Dream Vacation and my Income Replacement categories (amount 3 others) needed to be repaid so I just kept sticking dollars into them until they reached the number that I knew it should be. It's a little bit different in my situation because at the time I did it, all of the categories that I raided were fully funded and I wasn't adding to them anymore before the cash raid.

      That's an extreme example. But say I get a call tomorrow that my cousin from out west is going to be in town this weekend and do I want to go to dinner with her and my other cousin. It's the end of the month so there isn't tons of money in my dining out category. So I have to take some money out of my Clothing & Accessories category. I'm not going to pay that back. I'm going to trust that I made an honest assessment of my priorities and decided that seeing my cousin was more important than getting a new pair of shoes and there is nothing actually to "correct" in my budget. I mean, I'll eventually get those shoes but it will have to wait until there is enough in the category. I budget the same amount to Clothing (and to Dining Out for that matter) every month, so eventually I will get there.

      Reply Like 4
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      jenmas Thank you for the post.  I appreciate your input.  All of these replies have really helped me see the "intention" of YNAB.  I'm gaining a better understanding of how I should be handling these types of situations.  Thank you.

      Reply Like 2
      • gooded
      • Maroon_Snow.3
      • 8 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      jenmas And, you bring up a good point.  I almost always cover my overspending by "stealing" from my Emergency Fund.  But, depending on what I'm buying, I may want to think about "stealing" from other funds.

      For example, maybe it makes sense to charge an overspent "vehicle maintenance" to the emergency fund.  But maybe overspending on restaurants, or mini vacations, etc.....maybe that should be covered by one of the other "fun money" accounts.  You've got me thinking.  Thank you.

      Reply Like 3
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 8 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      gooded yup - generally if I need more in a discretionary category, it has to come from another discretionary category (going over in Groceries? Has to come from Dining Out since both are food expenditures). But this is just my rule for myself.

      Reply Like 3
      • Tif_Ann
      • Tif_Ann
      • 8 mths ago
      • 4
      • Reported - view

      gooded  Now you're getting into the true heart of YNAB - saving for purpose. Instead of "stealing" from the emergency fund for things like vehicle repairs, you should setup a vehicle repair category and either add funds every month or initially move money from your bulk "emergency fund" for it. Instead of a bulk $10,000 sitting in an "emergency fund" you may find that you have $2000 in vehicle repair, $2500 in medical deductible, $1000 in a random emergency fund, and $4500 in your income replacement fund (what most people think of emergency fund - the oh no I lost my job what will i do fund). Or whatever reasons you want to save money or may need to use those savings for.

      At some point, you fill up all those funds and then maybe consider investing.

      Reply Like 4
  • gooded  Patzer gave me almost the same advice 9 years ago in a similar situation. I listened to him and it was a good decision. 

    Reply Like 3
  • gooded said:
    you bring up a good point.  I almost always cover my overspending by "stealing" from my Emergency Fund. 

     Déjà vu flashbacks here after reading that statement. 🙂   I used to raid my "emergency fund" for EVERYTHING, making it an "Impulse Fund". Life is so much more stable now. Using the YNAB allocation and category system for 4.5 years......I have money coming out of my ears, or more precisely in every category. Okay, so I can't do everything quite as quickly as I'd like to, but every category is funded at a rate I can afford based on my income, and my emergency fund is now a true emergency fund (I break mine out to specific sub-categories). It hasn't been raided in a couple of years.

    Reply Like 4
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