Covering overspending from a previous month with future to be budgeted amount that has already been allocated. Where does money pull from?

Long time reader, first time poster here! It's the end of March, and I just noticed I overspent one category in February and I want to fix it to get rid of the red. I have all of March and 1/2 of April budgeted for, so my To Be Budgeted amount in March and April is $0. When I go back to the Feb category I overspent, I know I can highlight the red amount, select Inflow: to be budgeted, and it will be pulled from my budgeted in future amount. I did this, the overspent Feb category is now fixed, and I saw my budgeted in the future amount drop by the amount I pulled from the budgeted in future dollar amount, but how do I tell where (which category) in the future it pulled that amount from to cover the overspent category in February? And did it pull that money from my current month (March), or did it pull it from the next month I have money budgeted in (April)?

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  • In order for you to pull from “to be budgeted” in February you would have to have money in there. It wont let you cover for feb expense overage with the to be budgeted... like its not even an option. I just tried. In march it will show the red alert that says “youre overbudgeted please fix that” so you have to find money in march to send back to to be budgeted in order to clear up march. At least thats what it did when i just tried it.

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  • It doesn't pull from a future category. It lowered your To Be Budgeted in the future. It affects the farthest future month that you have budgeted money into categories. If that is April in your budget, you'll find the big number in the April header is now negative.

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  • Wiecked  and nolesrule Perhaps I'm not explaining this correctly. In my account, it is most definitely pulling it from future budgeted money, even when my TBB is $0. Here is a video of it: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1oYcCnPrgKvqHvp5Q5K90YG7uzckXRtZ2

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Humor me and check May or farther in the future.

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      • Cyan Steel
      • Cyan_Steel
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      nolesrule No problem. I did check that prior to posting and should've shown that in the video. May is the furthest I can go. It also shows nothing, which it should because I don't have the funds available yet to cover that month. I attached a screenshot. I learned of this trick (using inflow:to be budgeted to cover a past overspent category) from a Nick True MoMoney video, then posed the same question to him. He's not sure where it's pulling it from. My suspicion is that the next time I add money to the Inflow, it will deduct that dollar, but won't know until I try it. I'm really hoping that's the case and that it's not pulling it from a category that has already been budgeted for. With $1, it won't have much affect, but if I'd overspent $100, that could jeopardize my future budget. I spent hours last night combing through YNAB's help articles and videos, and can't find this addressed anywhere.

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Okay. You stumped me. I didn't notice anything that would tell me what happened. Maybe someone else will notice a detail that I missed.

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      • Cyan Steel
      • Cyan_Steel
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      nolesrule Yes, I hope someone does, or YNAB support jumps in and helps explain it. My suspicion about it pulling from future inflows was wrong. To test it, I added a $50 inflow to my checking account. The full $50 shows up as money to be budgeted in all future available months, so it's not covering the overspent category by deducting it from from future inflows. It has to be pulling it from a category that already has money allocated to it. With a lot of categories, a little extra available from previous months for every line item as a buffer, and that money spread out over two months, it would take me forever to determine which category it's pulling $1 from. 

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      • Wiecked
      • Happy Happy
      • Orchid_Tiger.5
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Okkkkeeeeyyyyy, that video was incredibly helpful and you have officially STUMPED me. Where the heck is it taking it from!!!!!! What the hay ho??? 

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  • YNAB had already decreased TBB in March to deal with the overspending. You just shifted how TBB was being decreased, but didn't change the fact it was the same as before.

    When you increased the budget value in Feb, you did two things at once:

    1. Lower TBB in March via a reduction in Funds For March
    2. Increase TBB in March via zeroing out Overspent in February

    These adjustments net to $0 so no impact to TBB in March (or thereafter).

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  • dakinemaui I don't know if I'm following you. If what you're saying is true, I shouldn't see any change in future budgeted money when I cover that overspend in the previous month, but I see future budgeted money decrease by that amount when I cover that overspend amount (as you can see in the video). At a glance, I don't see any categories where I think it may have pulled the funds from, but don't know if I should be looking at the budgeted amount or the available amount to detect a change. If there is no change there, then after covering that expense, I would've expected it to pull the $1 from future inflows, just like it does when it rolls over to a new month and you've overspent a category in the previous month. When I added a $50 inflow transaction to my checking account to test this, the full amount showed up TBB in all following months, so it didn't deduct it from TBB. To me, that says it had to have pulled it from a category that already had money allocated to it in either March or April.

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      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Basically, you turned $1 from overspending into overbudgeting, so the change offsets itself March.

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      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Regardless of whether YNAB or you cover the overspending from TBB, it's still covered from TBB.

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      • Cyan Steel
      • Cyan_Steel
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui  and nolesrule  Still trying to wrap my head around this. At the end of February, I had one category overspent by $1, so YNAB should have detrimented my TBB by $1 (giving me one less dollar to use for budgeting) in March. Now, at the end of March, I notice the overspend. When I corrected it by adding $1 from future budgeted money, it appeared to decrease the amount I had already budgeted in the future. At the time I addressed the $1, I had a TBB balance of $0 for both March and April and had a dollar amount listed for budgeted in the future, which decremented by $1 when I made the adjustment. It sounds like you're saying that YNAB had decreased my TBB in March by the overspend and padded my money budgeted in the future (by the amount I overspent in Feb) when February closed and I was just decreasing "budgeted in the future" back down to the correct amount when I fixed the overspend in February. Am I understanding that correctly?

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      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Yes, YNAB automatically reduces TBB in the following month to cover any red categories.

      Your budget entry pulled back Feb money that had been allocated into March -- also reducing TBB in the following month. However in doing so, YNAB no longer has to apply the reduction it was doing, so TBB has the same value.

      All you did was to move a dollar in the March header: from Funds For March to Overspending in Feb. The total of those numbers remains the same. Just like this:

      5 - 1 == 4 - 0

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  • Cyan Steel said:
    it appeared to decrease the amount I had already budgeted in the future

    Perhaps this is the sticking point. The "Budgeted In Future" header is not the sum of budget entries in future months. Instead, it is the amount of current month money that is being used by (or in support of) future budget entries.

    Assuming TBB is zero, you could flip to next month and budget $1,000,000 dollars without changing the current month BIF value.

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      • Cyan Steel
      • Cyan_Steel
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui I believe that helps me understand BIF tremendously. I think that was the sticking point. To be sure I understand this, please let me run this scenario past you and tell me if I'm right: At the end of February, let's say I have $4800 budgeted into the future and have overspent one category in February by $10. That means that YNAB will allow me, show me, $4790 to budget in March. I budget the $4790 in March. If I go back and look at February, I'll see that the category is overspent by $10. Back in February, it should also show me there is $4800 BIF because it has taken into account that $10 ($4790 + $10 overspent in Feb). When I go back to Feb and cover that overspend category with TBB, it puts that $10 back, then, still in February, should decrement the $4800 BIF and now show $4790 BIF.  In March, it would be $4790.00 allocated to budget.

      Like 1
      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel Sounds about right to me.

      You may find it instructional to try this scenario out in a new, test budget. Checking account with $4800 starting balance transaction and a $10 other transaction, both dated sometime in Feb. 

      I suspect you'll also find a test budget to be useful in exploring credit card scenarios as well. It's another commonly confused area, once you venture past the easy/primary case of a budgeted purchase.

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      • Cyan Steel
      • Cyan_Steel
      • 6 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui I appreciate the time you took helping me with this. I'm guessing the credit card scenarios you think I should run through come from what you saw on the video I shared. You're clearly very perceptive. A month ago, I didn't have my head wrapped around how credit cards work in YNAB. I thought I did, but didn't and noticed my available payment CC funds were climbing each month, even after a payment, on a card I haven't used in over a year. After watching numerous Nick True YouTube videos, I feel quite comfortable with it and made adjustments in YNAB to fix what I'm seeing over the next couple months, and rolled the excess money over to pay off yet another card (after a financially devestating divorce about 6 years ago, I've paid off about $50k in debt, using Dave Ramsey and the current version of YNAB). I ran test scenarios with the card in a test budget in YNAB, something I also picked up in Nick True's videos. I just ran the scenario with overspending that we just talked about and my understanding of it now matches what you are saying. More importantly, I can now see it in the test budget and it is matching what I expect to see the following month. Seriously,  dakinemaui , I appreciate the time you put into explaining this ~9 different ways until I finally wrapped my head around what you were trying to tell me. Thank you!

      Like 1
      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 6 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Cyan Steel You are most welcome!

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