I'm finally learning HOW to save money

I fell in love the first day I opened the program. Just the clarity of what you reserved your money for, and to see how much there is left for fun stuff/saving after all the obligatory expenses... I love it!

Money was a very stressful part of my grown up life. Ever since living on my own as a student, and seeing my savingsaccount slowly but steadily completely drain empty, I felt like I wasn't able to handle money. My parents were very strict on teaching me to save money and to work and earn my own money for stuff I wanted, but actually never tought me HOW to do that. Putting money aside in categories like mobile phone replacement, gives me the knowledge that once the time comes that I have to buy a new phone I will actually have the funding for that. 

I am a fan!

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  • I can relate to this a lot! I'm pretty new to YNAB. Even before finding it, I felt like I was managing better than my parents.  My parents do NOT budget. They definitely did not teach me anything about money (except, maybe a few things not to do 馃槃) One of the reason's I'm so excited to be using YNAB is that I'll be able to better prepare my own child for this stuff we call "adulting".

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  • That's awesome! I had a very similar beginning when I started using YNAB a few years ago.  I grew up learning absolutely nothing about money and made a lot of stumbles through college and early adulthood. Finally finding a program that laid out exactly what my money was for was a miracle.

    Glad you found the program!

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  • Me too.  My parents save a penny here and there buying cheap food, wear old clothes, but then don't shop around for their phone, gas and electricity.  They made me grow up thinking budgeting was all about deprivation, not negotiation.

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  • Good Intentions said:
    grow up thinking budgeting was all about deprivation, not negotiation.

     Nicely put. It's not depriving you. Perhaps momentarily depriving one category, but like your conclusion states, it's based on a negotiation. "Ok, which of you 2 (or more) categories is more important?" You're making a choice.  I'd rather have A than B.  B will get funded later, or perhaps wasn't necessary in the first place.

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    • Bruce I actually meant that bigger savings can often be made by being business like, asking for discounts, bargaining etc. Ie thinking big rather than nitpicking.

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  • Good Intentions said:
    I actually meant that bigger savings can often be made by being business like, asking for discounts, bargaining etc. Ie thinking big rather than nitpicking.

     lol.  Sorry for the mis-read on that one.  I agree with you.  And I think it's a combination of all the factors.  Negotiating among your categories/priorities as well as the bigger picture of negotiating better prices.  It's like we're trying to teach our kids...  If you don't ask, you'll never know.  The answer is a DEFINITE no if you don't ask, but if you  take a deep breath, muster up your courage, and simply ask, you just might get a better option.

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