Goals

I love the monthly goal feature but it would be nice if it would work on bi-monthly rather than just monthly goals. As I get paid on the 15th and the last business day of the month and it would really help me to keep better track of things if i could split the monthly goals to bi-monthly.

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  • Hi Powder Blue Panther!

    We want goals to help you break the paycheck-to-paycheck cycle, not pin you within it. We're working on ways to improve goals to make that an easier feat to accomplish. Are there certain categories you're aiming to fund bi-monthly? Instead of doing half of the amount twice a month for those categories, you could budget for half of those categories in full with one check and the other half with the second check until you're out of that cycle.

    And here's a bit more information on the different types of Goals.

    Like 2
    • Faness  yes any monthly obligation that is due on the first of the month I fund it 50% on the 15 and the remainder on the last business day of the month for the next month 

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    • Faness if there is a way to make the goals more granular to match real life bi- monthly tracking that would be great. 

      Like
  • Arguably, a better solution is to get ahead so you don't need any of that money from Dec. 15th until January. You can then just temporarily stash that check in a holding category and budget the entirety of Jan on Dec. 31 with a couple clicks.

    Like 8
  • Semi-monthly, people. Don't perpetuate the language abuse. 😁

    Like 2
    • dakinemaui I'm also a fan of "semi-monthly," but as always, it's complicated

      Like 1
      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Matthew only because dictionary writers won't hold the line...

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      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui That begs the question (🤮🤮🤮) of why they don’t. 

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      • Superbone
      • YNAB convert since 2008
      • Superbone
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui This is why I've adopted "fortnightly" for every two weeks. "Semimonthly" similarly removes the ambiguity for twice a month.

      Like 1
      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Superbone And what do you call something that happens six times per year?

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      • Superbone
      • YNAB convert since 2008
      • Superbone
      • 9 mths ago
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      dakinemaui I would call it "something that happens six times a year", I suppose. 😄 Or, "every two months." Better yet, I'd avoid ever having that situation so I wouldn't have to say anything. So far, so good.

      Like 2
      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 9 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      dakinemaui semi-monthly and bimonthly mean the same thing now and linguists (and our good friends, the lexicographers) could literally care less about it. 😈

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    • WordTenor do you mean "couldn't care less"? There's another debate that gets frustrating to some!

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      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      Orchid Device I most assuredly meant "could care less." :) 

      Like 1
    • WordTenor  *nods head* - Just had to put it out there! It's so often wrong! :)

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      • dakinemaui
      • dakinemaui
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor Sooo, you actually care some?

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      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 9 mths ago
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      Orchid Device To be clear, the meaning is that linguists don't give a [insert vulgarity of your choice] about the distinction, which is an idea which can be expressed in English as both "could care less" and "couldn't care less."  So yes, I meant to use "could care less" because this is a thread about prescriptive language, so I'm deliberately throwing in a completely standard usage of something prescriptivists get in twist about to illustrate that larger point. 🙂

      Like 2
      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor Oh, it can be expressed both ways. Only one makes any sense. Next people are going to start defending double negatives. 

      Like
      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Habanero Salsa Sweetpea, she's being too nice, but I feel no such compunctions. She knows way more than you do on this topic. Take a seat.

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      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor Irregardless, one purpose of language is communication, and if that has been accomplished, then it has been effective.

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      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      bevocat It doesn’t take a linguist to understand that, read literally, “could care less” doesn’t mean what people intend it to mean. So I’ll stay standing. Thanks, though. 


      I was raised by someone smarter than any three people here, so I’m fine defending my position whenever I feel like taking one. 

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      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Habanero Salsa So, I've only lived in the south a few years, but I know you're native to a place with this construction, so I hope I'll get its usage right, here...

      ...bless your sweet heart! <3 

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      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor Yeah, I definitely get it, but it’s supposed to be just “bless your heart.” “Oh, bless your heart” if you’re really dropping the bomb.

      Even better is to use “ma’am” in place of a NSFW word. Like, “Ma’am, you don’t know what you’re doing.” Or, “Excuse me, ma’am.” It comes across poorly in writing, though.

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      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
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      Habanero Salsa Oh, well thank you for the correction. Like I said, I'm nonnative to this variety. 

      I'll revise that to,

      Oh, bless your heart! 

      then.

      Like 1
      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor That’s much closer, ma’am.

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      • WordTenor
      • I have the honor to be your obedient servant
      • WordTenor
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Habanero Salsa Now, don't make me have to ma'am slap you. Run along.

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      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      WordTenor You’ll have to bring a lot more than that. 

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  • You guys are literally making my head explode.

    Like 2
      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Annieland That’s just wrong on so many levels. 

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  • Anyone here speak Japanese? Because this thread is totally yabai!

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      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Matthew I don't, but I have Google and I can appreciate your implication through use of ambiguous language.

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  • Habanero Salsa said:
    Only one makes any sense.

     If you live in a world without sarcasm. You know, the dry, witty, deadpan kind? 

     

    WordTenor said:
    semi-monthly and bimonthly mean the same thing now

     Here I was going to liken bimonthly to 3/4 meter and three-fourths. They're related and they look the same, but their development ran different historical paths, so the same symbol doesn't mean the same thing. 

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      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life If you think the people — not the people in this thread who are making a point of using phrases in a particular way — who say “I could care less” do so in a sarcastic way, I’m going to have to disagree. They’re the same type of people who think “begs the question” means “raises the question.” They aren’t doing it to make some kind of point or joke  

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    • Habanero Salsa We'll have to agree to disagree. I think it has developed such that "I could care less" inherently has a touch of sarcasm, whether the speaker knows it or not. I also think anyone who gets tripped up on it or tries to be "correct" is thinking about it too much. Kind of like "bimonthly," although there are admittedly more real consequences for unintended interpretations because bimonthly isn't informal language. :)

      Like
      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life There are some, obviously, like the people here, who do use it sarcastically. There are more who don’t. 

      I think that thinking about semantics, the evaluation of language, and how we evaluate people when they use what we consider to be nonstandard or nonsensical language is very interesting and I don’t mind thinking about it “too much.” I’m trying to upgrade my Spanish and one of the most interesting aspects, to me, is how I sound to a native speaker when I get the word order wrong or use the wrong words as between, say, por/para or ser/estar. Yes, they can probably understand me. Yes, I probably sound like a goof. There are grammatical, syntactical, and semantical issues at play and I’d rather try to be correct than merely understood, even if that is thinking too much. 

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      • bevocat
      • Sometimes, It Just Sucks to Be You
      • bevocat
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Habanero Salsa I'd say worrying about por/para and ser/estar is appropriate depending on the circumstances. An application or publication? Sure. Refine your language use to the most standard. The goal of your communication, among other things, is to signal a careful attention to the norms and willingness to put effort into adhering to them. If you're a guest (not a participant) at a quinces, you're not only wasting your time and effort that would be better spent enjoying yourself and being a lively interlocutor, you're signaling to your fellow guests that you're treating this occasion not as a diverting entertainment, but as a time to be evaluated and judged. The other guests came to have a good time, not take a Spanish test.

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      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      bevocat My Hispanic friends, and their relatives, disagree with your evaluation. The people I met in Ecuador disagree with your evaluation. They see me, correctly, signaling that their language is important to me. 
       

      I’ve only been to one quinceañera, though I’ve been invited to another on in a few months, but at the weddings, birthday parties, and random gatherings, I’m as lively an interlocutor as my personality permits, even if I say “¿Cómo se dice...?” or “Más despacio, por favor...” more than the average attendee. 

      Like 1
  • Habanero Salsa said:
    I think that thinking about semantics, the evaluation of language, and how we evaluate people when they use what we consider to be nonstandard or nonsensical language is very interesting and I don’t mind thinking about it “too much.”

     I quite enjoy metacognition and its related endeavors, too. 

     

    Move Light Sound Life said:
    I also think anyone who gets tripped up on it or tries to be "correct" is thinking about it too much.

     I liken this to something I experience on a weekly basis: people trying to use good grammar to impress without really knowing how it should be used. For example, "I am good" and "I am doing well" are correct. However, I get a lot of "I am well" and I always wonder if that's what they really mean - are they really talking about their health? That's great if they are... But I get condescending looks sometimes if I respond with "I am good," so my guess is someone said"good" was bad, but people don't know the reason and therefore don't know when it's fine.

    They're usually the same people who fall over their words trying to say "couldn't care less" because they don't know which is correct. That phrase to me is like taking the absolute value of a negative number. Abs|-3| and 3 are completely interchangeable.

    Like
      • Habanero Salsa
      • Second generation user
      • Aquamarine_Pony.8
      • 9 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Move Light Sound Life I usually go with “I’m doing well.” I save “I’m good” causally to say, “I don’t need any help/more tea/more salsa/etc.”

      To me, it’s more like people who say, “You should go with my friend and I” or “Me and my friend are going.” They genuinely don’t understand when to use objective or subjective. Some people genuinely think “I could care less” means they don’t care at all. 

      Move Light Sound Life said:
      Abs|-3| and 3 are completely interchangeable.

       They are, but 3 and -3 aren’t, and “I couldn’t care less” and “I could care less” are more like  3 and -3.

      Like
  • I'm confused. How is "could care less" correct while "couldn't care less" isn't?

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  • Just for Kicks

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