I wish no punches were ever thrown.

The good news is that because of YNAB, we had $5,100 to pay cash for repairs on three different used vehicles THIS MONTH. (Good lord, why does it all happen in the same month?). The bad news is obvious, right?  I am MAD about spending it on #$%@#@ vehicles.  One of them is a Honda CR-V against which I hold no grudge because that car has been reliable and low cost.  But the American trucks, not so much - especially the Ford F-350 dually that is built for long drives and towing and usually breaks down far from home with a load of horses.  It did it again (no horses, yay) to the tune of $3,000 and an 8-hour round trip to go pick it up from the shop we left it at.  I think we might sell it and try to save for something more reliable.

I remember that Rolling with the Punches is a rule.  But I actually hate that rule, I want nothing to go wrong on my savings / paying off debt journey.   This is just such a fervent wish of mine, that nothing in life would go wrong...

I think we have paid down about $12,000 in debt since we started using YNAB in February and cash for car repairs for about $8,000 (including this last episode) so it is working like it is supposed to.  I just feel so much safer when there is a pile of cash in the account and seeing $5100 leave in one month is unnerving. But it was there - and I didn’t even have to dip into the treasured New Puppy category.

Deep breath.

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    • Khaki Storm
    • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
    • Khaki_Storm.1
    • 11 mths ago
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    As my dad would say, "what mankind makes breaks". He was in maintenance for many years. I feel like I have a good car when the repairs average out to about $1,000 a year per car. That's not all our cars, we've had duds. My car just needed some work for $600, and that's all its needed this year, so I'm happy. My daughters car needed about $1,500 this year, we'll see how it does next year. 

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    • Khaki Storm
    • YNAB book topics online: https://support.youneedabudget.com/r/q5w48j
    • Khaki_Storm.1
    • 11 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Also, hauling stuff is hard and would definitely increase the average cost of repairs. 

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  • I feel for ya! When stuff like this happens, I like to imagine how bad it easily could have been.

    As long as you keep getting up when life knocks ya down, you're doing well. Good luck!

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      • Julie
      • sandhills_rider
      • 11 mths ago
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      dakinemaui Thanks for this reminder that what we focus on becomes bigger, best to focus on the good side!

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  • The “I get sad when there’s not a big pile o money there” is a good financial instinct. Don’t let it rule you into senseless things like taking on debt when you could pay cash for something, but on the other hand, don’t feel guilty about it. Many people in deep debt are there because the instinct to have money sitting around doing nothing is insufficiently honed. Great work!

    Like 1
    • WordTenor This is so me. We are saving up for some big expenses that we will pay cash for, and I'm already fearing our account balance being lower once we spend it. Trying to remind myself, it's not going on the credit card as debt! This is what we designated it for! It is hard to think that way.

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      • Julie
      • sandhills_rider
      • 11 mths ago
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      Purple Admiral Thanks for this, truly.

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  • Purple Admiral said:
    This is what we designated it for

    It's often easy to lose sight of this. We accumulate money to allow us to do/have stuff -- it's a means to an end. As long as that's the stuff that's important to us, all is well. 

    Like 3
    • dakinemaui paying in cash for large things is a new life concept for me that came along with starting YNAB. I think that is part of the reason! I was always amazed at people who "paid in cash" for everything, it seemed so impossible to achieve. I believe once I have a few purchases under my belt it will become the new normal. Right now it's still "I truly cannot believe I have this much in my bank account and I pay a credit card in full every month".

      Like 2
  • Yay, a thread where I can selfishly share my own punch and stay somewhat on-topic :).  11 months ago, while my husband was away, my nearly 15 yr old dog collapsed and couldn't get up.  I rushed him all over and ended at an amazing veterinary neurology hospital, who correctly diagnosed a ruptured disc in his neck, repaired it, and 9 days and $8,000 later, he was good as new.  Yep, savings for a whole year invested in that old dog.

    Annnnd 2 days ago, husband away, dog suddenly can't climb the deck steps and craps out on the kitchen floor.  Off to neurology again for another MRI.  Yay for no surgery this time, but an inflammation in his spine requiring steroids and only one night in the hospital instead of nine!  He's back home walking again, just $3,000 later.  I didn't know how much to keep in my Vet category, and still don't.  I decided on $1000 this year, so I covered the bill from that, obviously.  And then about $800 I miraculously had in holding from this month that I was HOPING to send to next month since this month's income was low.  And then rounded out the last $1,200 from a general unexpected expense category. 

    Putting $1000 back into Vet in November, but my average monthly vet expense is $937!  Am I supposed to save $10,000 in there???  This dog is gonna be 16 in 2 months, and is rickety but happy and healthy.  Yes, thank GOD I could at least cover this punch yet again with reserves, and Christmas will probably not be as ugly as last year.  But ugh, this dog!!!

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      • Julie
      • sandhills_rider
      • 11 mths ago
      • 2
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      Annieland Like I said above, animals are worth every cent.  Our animal categories, combined, are probably $600 each month - I will have to look. For me they are what makes life worth living. And why we have the stupid trucks in the first place.

      Like 2
  • Julie said:
    But it was there - and I didn’t even have to dip into the treasured New Puppy category.

     Better start saving $100 a month for the rest of that puppy's life!!!  Wish I did! 😜

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      • Julie
      • sandhills_rider
      • 11 mths ago
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      Annieland The animals are worth every cent!! Unlike vehicles IMHO.

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    • Julie I could Never trade my pup, but my car? Definitely negotiable. 😉

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  • This is such a good reminder to pump up the true category before aggressively tackling debt. Dave Ramsey’s $1000 emergency fund doesn’t really cut it. 

    From the many books I’ve read these past months on finances, the best advice is Japanese cars /trucks 2-3 years old. That’s if they make them heavy duty enough for pulling horses. :)

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  • Purple Foal said:
    This is such a good reminder to pump up the true category before aggressively tackling debt.

    This is not a universally held opinion. Personally, I would see the interest saved as a victory, since the end state of debt is identical (IF the emergency, in fact, does occur).

    (Yes, I am assuming continued availability of credit.)

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