The Official 2018 Debt Smackdown

Welcome to the Official 2018 Debt Smackdown! 


Happy new year everyone! 

I know a few of use have been chomping at the bit to get going with 2018's debt - so with out further ado, I present this years spreadsheet! First of all, quick thank you to @epicfroth, who set up 2017's,  and @rolltide who did a fair amount of support in the last few months, and @anniebananie for setting up the idea back in 2015 I think? 

So what's this about? If you are holding onto some debt as you enter 2018 - and would like to get rid of it - this challenge is for you.

To the participants from last year, welcome back! For some of us, our total debts are too large to smack down completely in one calendar year, so if you're here from last year, congratulations on your progress and let's keep on doing this! In 2017, we collectively paid down over $900,000 in debt! That's no small feat, it's pretty mind boggling!

For all new participants, we are happy to have you join in this year! New blood is always welcome. Let's all motivate each other to pay off those debts and continue moving forward to financial freedom.

There's only one small change to things this year, and that is that this challenge is a shared one between the two forums/communities. Hopefully, that won't bring any problems! (Link to the Forum post here)

How it works:


1. List the amount of total debt that you owe. 
This step is to give you an awareness of your current debt situation. Feel free to share, this forum is a safe and nonjudgmental place. You can also decide to keep this information private, you don't have to post your total here if you are not comfortable doing so. 

2. Post in this thread the total amount of debt you would like to pay off during the 2018 calendar year. (This part is required.) 
Feel free to break down the amounts by credit card/type of debt. Also, if you have a specific plan or some ideas on how you plan to pay down the debt, you can post that too. Maybe your plan will spark some ideas for others on how to tackle their own debts!

3. Check in monthly in this thread and report on how your debt smackdown is going. (This part is required.)

4. Post monthly on the 2018 Google Spreadsheet to track your progress. (This part is required.)
Claim a line on the spreadsheet, and post your total debt to be paid off, and the monthly amount that you send off towards it. Some people track their total payments and don't account for interest, some people account for principal only. The method you choose is up to you!

If you come across this challenge later in the year, no worries, you can still jump right in. Just put zeroes in the months where you had not joined the challenge yet, and start in the month you join in. 
 

Last year, we collectively paid off $900,000. Let's smash that number again in 2018!

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  • March check-in:  Amazing month!!!  I got my tax refund this month and took a "loan" from my emergency fund to pay off my credit card COMPLETELY!  

    Credit card was $8207.26 Jan 1st- now is $0!

    Personal loan was $24,109, is now $19,288.     Is on monthly instalments, so will go down automatically, completely done next March. 

    So total paid this month is $8880.27, or $13,028.26 for the year.

    NOTE: I still have some money in my E-fund, enough for any emergency except unemployment.  I made the choice to borrow from it because my job is locked in until next March, so I could save on the credit interest and aggressively pay back my E-fund over the next 8 months.  Not the smartest choice for everyone, but it was worth it to me.

    Reply Like 9
      • Dazed
      • and a little less confused
      • dazed
      • 1 yr ago
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      • Reported - view

      Turquoise Trumpet I would have made the same choice to pay off the CC if I were in your shoes.  Congrats on your amazing month!

      Reply Like 2
    • Dazed Thanks!  I've been reading a lot about the FI movement lately, and I've been super motivated to move full speed ahead as a result.   I'm so excited to be moving toward FI, one small step at a time!!

      Reply Like 1
  • March Check-in

    Started YNAB in February and joined this challenge earlier this month with $105k in unsecured debt, ouch!  In March, DH received a (much higher than expected) annual cash bonus at around $18.5k after taxes.  With this bonus we:

    • paid off our (current) highest interest CC
    • set aside a small fortune for a new Herman Miller home office chair DH has been dreaming of (DH works from home in a terribly uncomfortable wooden Ikea chair)
    • fully funded the kids' "Camp" category for the summer
    • topped off all of our True Expenses March goals

    1. Starting Point - $105k, NOW - $92k

    • $12,593 - CC1 - (16.24%) - ($12,593) - $0 - PAID IN FULL 😎
    • $5,788 - Personal LOC/Overdraft Protection (11.24%) - ($130) - $5658
    • $19,810 - Consolidation Loan (14.99%) - ($0) - $19,810
    • $15,892 - CC2 - (24.24%, currently 0%) - ($0) - $15,892
    • $11,664 - CC3 - (17.49%, currently 0%) - ($0) - $11,664
    • $19,982 - CC4 - (26.24%, currently 0%) - ($0) - $19,982
    • $9,350 - Student Loan (5.5%) - ($189) - $9,161
    • $10,095 - 401K Loan (4.25%) - ($91) - $10,004
    • Those with ($0) payments were paid this month before I started this challenge.
    • Interest paid in March - $378

    2. 2018 Goal - $10,000 - REVISED 2018 GOAL - $25,000

    I'm feeling a bit emboldened by the generous bonus we received and by how YNAB is working for us that I've revised my debt pay-down goal. I did a bit of forecasting armed with my newfound "true expenses" knowledge and determined that we should be able to put away an extra $500/mo toward debt, with some wiggle room and assuming we stick to our budget. Minimum payments on the above debt are just under $2k/mo, so I've upped the budget to $2,500 for debt payments. According to my Debt Snowball Table in Undebt.it , we'll be (unsecured) debt free in September 2020!

    Reply Like 5
    • Dazed I get quarterly bonus and before I started YNAB in January it just melted away into my spending categories. I'm so excited to actually have a plan for it in place i.e. savings and debt. Congratulations!!

      Reply Like 2
  • My March Debt Smackdown progress:

    • 2018 Debt Smackdown goal: $8,200
    • March's debt smackdown payments: $1060
    • Total 2018 Debt Smackdown to date: $2893.17

    I am 35% of the way there! Last month, my folks told me they would pay off a portion of one of my student loans, but they generously decided to take over the payments for me. I am super grateful, and it will help us reach our goals that much faster, to the tune of about $200 a month. In fact, I paid $245 more this month than last month, so we're on pace!

    Good work everyone!

    Reply Like 4
  • Here's my March check in. My progress for the year to date is behind, but I'm okay with that because I've achieved a key savings goal this month. Now I will have more dollars to put toward paying down my car loan. And I've set up undebt.it , which is beyond helpful in plotting my debt pay down. It helps me easily see how fast I can payoff the loan based upon how much extra I can put toward it each month, and accordingly I've already budgeted April's extra $400 payment toward my car loan.

    Reply Like 4
  • March Check in: 

    Car: 288

    Dexter's surgery (my dog's cancer surgery that I have on credit card, no interest): 114.33 for a total of 402.33 this month, 1863.51 total, 31.32%

    Could not put much of my tax return towards debt like I wanted to, because I had knee surgery March 1 and I don't know how much that will cost, so I put most of it into my medical fund until I know...

    Reply Like 4
  • End of March check in, now at last hitting my target of £500 reduction per month.

    End of Jan: £7,040.77 - Reduced by £54.46

    End of Feb: £6710.73 - Reduced by £330.04

    End of March: £6147.67 - Reduced by £563.06 😀

    Total reduction: £893.10

    What is even more exciting is that I now have a £1600 emergency fund built from zero over the same period. I could have paid that to my debts but I feel much more secure having that right now. Most of my debt is non-interest bearing, I paid £45 interest last month so it isn't a priority at this stage to clear the interest bearing debts but that will reduce soon.

    Reply Like 4
      • Dazed
      • and a little less confused
      • dazed
      • 1 yr ago
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      Aquamarine Storm (67697f3db38d) That's a great feeling!  I'm getting that same feeling of security when I fund my True Expenses goals.  It's like a weight is being inched off my shoulders.  I do have a $1k emergency fund, that I use monthly to bridge me from one paycheck to the next.  I expect the True Expenses buffer will help to alleviate the need to do that going forward.

      Reply Like 3
  • Yep, March is still a pretty awful month, and April isn't as funded as I would like, but I know how much I'll be making at a minimum in April, which makes me feel okay covering April and May at once in some categories. In the meantime, I dug up some extra funds and made an $88 extra payment (most of which went to interest, but I'm counting total paid, and it means my next autopay will go almost entirely to principle!) so I can remain perfectly on track at the end of the quarter!!

     

    Starting Debt: $19,973.84
    Paid in March: $592
    Remaining Debt: $17,684.75
     

    Goal: $10,000
    Total Paid: $2,500
    Percent to Goal: 25.00%

    Reply Like 3
  • Joined in late March!

    2018 Debt paydown goal:

    $7,000

    Total paid in March:

    $368.00

    Reply Like 2
  • Line 146: Right now we owe $77,000, at the highest it was $89,000 (2015).  We've been a little slow and steady while husband is finishing his degree (finished in December 2018) once he is finished we will be very fast and furious about paying the rest off ASAP (by August 2021, ten years since the start of this journey). 

     

    The debt is a combination of a car loan, student loans, medical bills, and credit cards. Our goal is to pay it off as follows. Even though we are focusing on 2018 I have included our goals for 19-21.  In 2018 our goal is to pay off $14,000. 

    •  Car Loan- 06/18; $1,585
    • Student Loan (SL)#1- 10/18; $845
    • Medical- 12/18; $2,000
    • CC#1- 02/19; $3,000
    • Perkins Loan- 04/19; $3,500
    • SL#2- 08/2019; $5,400
    • SL#3- 11/19; $5,450
    • SL#4- 02/20;  $5,500
    • Collegiate Loan- 06/20; $6,100
    • SL#5- 08/20; $7,400
    • SL#6- 10/20; $7,600
    • SL#7- 02/21; $7,800
    • CC#2- 06/21; $8,700
    • SL#8- 08/21; $8,800

    We listed our debts from smallest to largest and I chose to not combine all my student loans into one because I need the gratification of crossing them off one by one. It's going to be a long arduous journey, but it isn't impossible. 
     

    Reply Like 4
    • Checking in for April. We paid $1,269.99 towards our debts this month. Since we are paying the minimums, I gotta say it is hard calculating everything out but I think that this is amazing. We are losing 1/3 our income after this month so we will see how it goes. Perseverance will prevail in the face of long-suffering. 

      Reply Like 1
  • March Check-in:

    Not a fun one 😕 I've been using YNAB correctly since August last year (and overall since Feb '17) so anything before that time wasn't properly recorded. 

    Turns out March is the month where all my annual bills are due. I didn't intentionally do this so finding things charged to my account that I didn't know were due was jarring, especially when I had budgeted for other expenses- luckily I was aware of these subscriptions/bills, just not their due dates. Future recurring transactions have now been set up.

    March also happens to be the month where everyone has a birthday?! 

    This month was definitely a roll with the punches kinda month, I won't lie when I say I'm extremely upset that I now have more CC debt to pay off and I can't get new tyres for my car just yet. Going to push through.

    Starting Debt: $3234.71
    Paid in March: $449.43 | Spent in March: $445.31

    Remaining Debt: $3185.40

    Reply Like 3
    • pureneon I’m also dreaming of new tyres and had to push them back. They’re now in line behind a new battery which I can’t afford either. Frustrating. 

      Reply Like
  • March Check-in:

    March was a very good month.  A better than expected Annual Bonus allowed me to pay off my credit card completely even with a) buying a new iPad Pro and b) going on a week long Caribbean Cruise.  I was even able to put a little extra towards my auto loan.  Here’s how things look:

    Reply Like 6
      • kayjenx
      • Debt Ninja Trainee
      • kayjenx
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Keith Borders I totally love your charts and I am so stealing this idea for my personal spreadsheet :)

      Reply Like 1
      • Dazed
      • and a little less confused
      • dazed
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      kayjenx Me too!

      Reply Like 1
    • Dazed kayjenx   Thank you, both!  Steal away!  Seeing the bars decrease each month really helps in the motivation department!

      Reply Like 1
  • March Check-in:

    Debt #1: $6767.51 (-$2322.75) 

    Debt #2:  $14767.40 (-$525.05) 

    Debt #3: $14695.72 (-$537.10)

    Total for March: $3384.90

    Reply Like 3
  • March was a bad month for me :(  I went on a vacation to Paris with a cash budget and did not stick to it.  I don't know why it's so hard for me to stay focused.  It's been pretty difficult especially with a significant other who does not care for budgeting or any financial conversation at all.   

    I just discovered undebt.it and it says that I should be able to pay off my debts by January 2019! I just have to keep myself accountable.   Spending releases an emotional "high"  that comforts me.  I just need to read the board at least weekly to keep myself motivated.  

    So I'm starting anew.  Total debt is $20,316.  I will set aside $2100 to pay it off. I have set aside a bit of allowance so I don't feel "deprived."    Starting off 2019 and making that last payment would be a dream come true. I know setbacks are a part of life but I need to finally get serious and show some self-control. 

     

    Reply Like 5
    • Khaki Python Oh Khaki Python, You are writing my story too! Literally - I have $21 K left in CC debt, want to pay at least 2K per month (in payments),  have a (wonderful) partner who doesn't want to talk about finances, and get a big (dissociative) hit from spending. Clearing my CC debt by the end of the year for me is possible if I can show some self-control. 

      So - what gets in your way? How do you plan to make the changes that will make your "dream come true"?

      I ask in hopes to support you, and also learn something that will help me!

      Reply Like 2
    • Aquamarine Horse (26da1ee4a41a) I've been asking myself the same question! I think its a combination of laziness and weakness.  We just need self-control.  I have to remind myself that my actions are setting an example for my husband.  If I  slip a bit he'll take an in inch and turn into a mile. I know he'll get annoyed with me, but I have to keep forging onward with my end goal in mind. If I can't use cash then I just can't make a purchase.  Also checking into YNAB and this forum helps keep me in check. When it's out of sight it's out of mind and I fall back into old habits. 

      Also, being blatant honesty with my peers has been working recently. I'll tell them my plan to get out of debt. I have to make some sacrifices now to be financially free. 

      Reply Like 1
  • I want to pay down at least $11,000 of my $26,932 in credit card debt in Apr-Dec.   Since I expect to take a trip to visit family this year, I hope I can pull it off.  I've paid off $4800 since Jan.

    Reply Like 4
  • when  I joined the challenge, I had already included the payments I had made in March and listed my debts as they were after the payments were made. as it happened, I was able to contribute a little more and reduced my debt a teeny tiny bit by contributing $13.78 toward the principle. everything helps! 

    Reply Like 7
  • I checked in with my monthly payments for March. I figured out that when I pay of one CC in July and then snowball my payments into the other one, I will have payed off all my debt by September! Hooray!

    Reply Like 6
  • March total payment: $4,522.23

    Amount over minimums: $ 1,600

    Reply Like 3
  • We're looking pretty good on the spreadsheet now, 41% paid off towards target for the year.  Really hoping we can smash away more than that target now, as at the start of the year I was doing a few hours here and there but now I'm working permanent part time.

    Reply Like 3
  • March check-in!

    This month had 5 Fridays, so 5 pay days for me :) And DH is still working 6day weeks...So even though our 9 year old poodle mix baby got really sick and required a $500 vet visit (3 night stay for HGE and meds, but she's herself again so well worth it), and we went a little crazy eating out and spending $300 over our family entertainment budget -_-, we were still able to send an extra $2,200 payment to our car loan! A couple more months and we'll have the car title in our hands 😁 this puts us at 39.49% of our $20k goal with 9 more months to go

    Reply Like 3
  • This month has been depressing for debt pay-off. Can't seem to stick to the budget for food and it's eating away our debt pay-off capacity.

    Current Situation:

    Starting Balance: $37,573.08

    Current Balance: $34,255.29

    Total Debt Paid (2018): $3,317.79

    This Month: $919.46

    This month has been the worst so far. And a part of it has to do with annual bills. We had to pay property taxes for almost $400 this month which we didn't even know we were supposed to pay. We are currently renting from my in-laws and they didn't tell us that they expected us to pay the property tax. Just found the bill on my step. In April we have to renew the property insurance ($970) on our rental property (we rent out our own home which is too far away). Thankfully we have some set aside from our "sinking funds" but since we used some for the insurance we have to put that back this month.

    Reply Like 1
    • kayjenx  What things are keeping you from sticking to your food budget? Is it anything you can short-circuit with a little planning, or have you tried to cut it too much to make your budget fit your debt paydown plan?

      Reply Like
      • kayjenx
      • Debt Ninja Trainee
      • kayjenx
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      WairereRose Well... I typed up that message 3 times and deleted it because I didn't want to bad mouth my spouse but he LOVES to eat out / order out and often claims that there is "nothing" to eat in the house even when we have a meal plan and bought everything and/or there is food in the fridge and cupboard because he doesn't want to eat what we have. If I say it's not in the budget just means I will get the "you take all my money on pay day. What do you do with it?" talk. He feels like we are "rolling in it" especially now that I have set up funds which means that we just "have the money when we need it". 😓

      Reply Like 1
    • kayjenx that’s really tough. I hope he has a lightbulb moment soon that helps him come on board, and I hope it’s not too tough for you to get through. 

      I don’t suppose you could have an “eating out” category, and a “rest of the month” food category to help him differentiate? I really don’t know what to suggest. I feel for you. Hang in there. At least you aren’t completely alone in your budgeting journey with us here to support you.

      Reply Like 1
      • MartyH
      • MartyH
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      kayjenx That $400 surprize kind of sucks; property taxes aren't normally paid by the renter.  I hope the rent is a good deal and it is just a simple misunderstanding.  I suggest making sure there aren't any more surprises like that. 

      Also make sure you and your in-laws both have the right insurance in place.  Renters insurance for you to cover your belongings and they should have Rental Property Insurance to cover the property.  The insurance (and any deductible from a claim) should be on them, not you.

      Reply Like 1
      • kayjenx
      • Debt Ninja Trainee
      • kayjenx
      • 1 yr ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      MartyH My in-laws built the house just for us to live in (with their funds because we couldn't get another mortgage) and we are paying them "rent" to repay them. I don't mind paying the property tax because it's a sweet deal but I just wish they didn't wait till the month it was due to "hint" something.

      WairereRose We have a "dining out" budget and both that and groceries will be over because if we run out of one thing, and have to go to the store again, we will end up buying more things even if I say no. Really frustrating because I would say we can't afford something and when I'm at the counter I'll notice the cashier adding it to my tally. I often consider doing the shopping on my own, but my toddler loves to go with me and it's hard to shop and watch her, but sometimes I really think it would be better for us.

      Reply Like 2
      • MartyH
      • MartyH
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      kayjenx It does sound like just a misunderstanding.  But do make sure the insurance is all in line.  I'm glad your inlaws are generous enough to do that for you.

      Reply Like 1
  • April check-in:
    Paid $1331.61, which brings me to 100% of my goal, and to debt freedom!

    Reply Like 22
      • MicroSpice
      • Crazy Person
      • Microspice
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
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      boodles8 So many congratulations!

      Reply Like 1
    • boodles8 WTG! Congratulations. So looking forward to getting to my goal this year.

      Reply Like
      • Violet Drill
      • Violet_Drill_0bf6fcf19d
      • 1 yr ago
      • 1
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      boodles8 Great job! I bet that feels so good!!

      Reply Like 1
      • HappyDance
      • YNABing consistently since 2014
      • HappyDance
      • 1 yr ago
      • 4
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      boodles8 

      Nice job!  Okay, so is it time to mosey on over to the savings challenge and put those dollars to work on a new goal?  When I transitioned from paying off debt to saving, I also reviewed my categories and adjusted quite a few up a little for life-style and enjoyment.

      Reply Like 4
    • boodles8  Congratulations! 

      Reply Like 1
  • Early April check in: I paid off the last credit card!!!  woot!!  Let's do the numbers:

    CC (8%) : Paid In Full

    NI Home improvement: $1332 ($244 to be paid) (5 more payments!) 

    Dental balance: $563 ($75 to be paid) (6 more payments if not increased and if no new dental debt occurs) 

    NI Computer loan: $1450 (100 to be paid) (14 more payments)

    Total Debt: 3345

    Total April Payments: 670 (paid and scheduled)

    Next month, throwing extra from the credit card at the dental bill!  woot!

    Reply Like 6
  • Today I sat down and figured out our taxes.  I was fully expecting to owe at least $13000 to federal and a few thousand to state.  We have been paying minimums towards debt to stockpile everything for taxes since January 1st.  We were able to save 12,000 to put towards the taxes with one check still to come before the 17th.  Super excited when we only owed 7500 total!!!!!!  With the extra we paid off our lowest credit card and still have enough to put 1000 away for emergencies.  Now to smash the rest of the debt... we have completed 27% of the debt we listed in the spreadsheet and after that it will be the house.  We are on track to be 100% debt free by 11/2021

    Reply Like 9
  • March Check in:  we had unexpected income in the form of an insurance policy we no longer need, which we surrendered.  After deducting taxes, there was enough to pay off credit card #1.  I'm doubling our 2018 payoff goal from $7,500 to $15,000, with the goal of paying off CC #2.

    Reply Like 4
  • Early April Check-in

    Currently I have $1000 set aside to pay money I borrowed. I'm looking at the $1000 and thinking how great it would be to throw it on my cc. As my credit card is still in the 7k range😡. But my mom is really stressed out that I pay this borrowed debt as soon as possible...

    As of today my cc is at $7537.51, I redeemed travel points $109 and paid back all of April's spending $225.71. I have set aside to pay $100 (which will always be my minimum to pay) and if I live within my budget I will have an additional $266.57 that I could pay on my card - I would leave April at 7170.94, not including the interest I earned.

    But I could put all the money I set aside and get myself close to 5K owing...

    I haven't paid interest in some years, so it's a bit upsetting seeing large interest amounts being dumped on my balance. I talked to my cc to see if they could lower my interest rate. They are useless and said change to a lower interest card. Which I don't want because I lose the potential to get travel points...

    Suggestions?

    DEBT 

    JAN 

    FEB 

    MARCH 

    APRIL

    C1 

    3810.58 

    8072.11 

    7399.89 

    (-100, -330, -1000) 

     Current 7537.51

     (-109, -225.71, -100, 266.57)

    Borrowed 

    3000 

    3000 

    2336.88 (-663.12) 

     2000 (-336.88)

    C2 

    422.76 

     0

    C3 

    98.89 

    0 (+5) 

    (+5)

     (+5.18)

    Reply Like 2
    • ISuckatMaths I have two quick thoughts about your questions:

      1. If the borrowed money is from your mom then pay her back.  Regardless of math, relationships matter more and you need to be respectful of her and her stress.

      2. Go for the lower interest rate instead of the travel benefits until you get to zero.  At this point debt reduction should be prioritized over travel unless travel is an absolute necessity.   Get aggressive with reducing spending or increasing income so you can make your debt go away and start travelling again :)

      Reply Like 6
    • ISuckatMaths Just so I’m clear...

      The Air Points gave you $109, and you’ve paid the full amount of purchases this month plus an additional $100, and you’re still going backwards with the interest?

      If this is the case then those potential air points are costing you dearly - are they worth the emotional stress?

       I agree with the previous poster, get your Mum sorted ASAP. Relationship is more important. I know it’s hard when you see an opportunity to get ahead, but short term gain won’t win if you’re still making mathematically unsound decisions, and if you haven’t paid her back she will be less willing (or possibly unable) to help you out again in the future.

      Sometimes sacrificing the “rewards” actually frees you from the debt they’re designed to keep you in. I do hear you on this though, as I still have my reward card - but it’s on ice while I get the balance back to being able to be paid in full each month while it’s in use (I have a 6 month course being charged on it, 3 more payments/months to go). It’s hard to give up these perceived rewards even when the math shows clearly that they aren’t worth as much as we value them.

      You could consider a 0% transfer to another organisation, and keeping your existing card for everyday use (but lower the limit), and use the 0% period to pay off the balance in total. Just be really careful playing that game, it has the potential to turn really bad really fast. Cut up the 0% card the moment it arrives in the mail so you aren’t tempted to use it at all for anything.

      Reply Like 4
      • ISuckatMaths
      • Where Budget and Math collide
      • ISuckatMaths
      • 1 yr ago
      • 5
      • Reported - view

      Turquoise Trumpet Thank you for you words of wisdom. As much as it hurts, I will not transfer the 1k to the credit card. And I found a cc that does 0% balance transfer for 12 months. So if I get approved I will transfer the lot there, use the travel credit card for regular spending and pay it off and still get the points. If I don't get approved I will move the card to a lower interest card.

      Reply Like 5
      • ISuckatMaths
      • Where Budget and Math collide
      • ISuckatMaths
      • 1 yr ago
      • 4
      • Reported - view

      WairereRose Thank you as well for your words of wisdom. I probably didn't see the math not working out as in the last three months I got over $300 back. But without you pointing it to me I would not have looked at the rewards v. the interest charges.

      The 0% card idea is great, I completely forgot there is a great 0% for 12months cc, so I've applied for it and will find out if I qualify.( I've done the 0% game before so I know the rules and have already planned to have the funds cleared in about 8-10 months, but good point to be very careful, thank you). If I do not qualify, I will move the card to a lower interest card and let go of those potential points.

      Reply Like 4
    • ISuckatMaths Glad to hear you have a good plan moving forward! 

      Reply Like 3
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