Overspending not transferring to next month

So today is June 1st, which means the budget has adjusted to the next month. I also got paid today, and since i ran out of funds last week, i happen to over spend just a smidge in a few categories, with plans to cover it with the paycheck i got today. However, while the leftover funds from May transferred to June in the given category, it doesn't transfer the negative amount. Instead i am having to budget money i got today in May's budget, which then shows may as over budgeted? If i just put in in June's budget, it doesn't calculate the negative from last month and it is just overall not working. There has to be a better work around for this. Why cant the negative amount just transfer along with all the positives? 

Maybe i am missing something, please help. 

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  • My understanding is when overspending happens in one month on a credit card, it does not roll over, or rather, it rolls into the credit card balance.  To cover that overspending, if it was on a credit card, budget to the card, not the overspent categories..

    Personally, I will WAM to prevent overspending in the month it occurs, which eliminates some of these problems.

    Reply Like 3
  • It is a design feature of YNAB to zero out negative categories at month rollover.  The money comes out of TBB in the new month.  This forces you to recognize that the money is gone, which can make the new month over budget if you had budgeted it before the month started.  What you need to do is find which categories you are willing to reduce *AND SPEND LESS FROM* in sufficient amounts to eliminate the over budget condition.

    I really dislike doing this in the new month, so I arrange to cover any overspends and make the decision where I will spend less during the month the overspend happens.  But the feature of automatically zeroing out the overspend and taking it from TBB in the new month exists in case the user neglects to do as I do; then at month rollover, the user needs to decide how to deal with the fact that more money was spent from some categories than was planned.

    This is Rule 3 in action.  YNAB calls it "Roll with the Punches," which doesn't resonate with me because I have never been a boxing fan.  I'd prefer to call Rule 3, "The Money's Gotta Come from Somewhere."  Overspends don't exist in isolation.  They borrow from the nebulous "rest of the budget," and the best practice is to cover them by reducing the rest of the budget appropriately.  This is where the budgeter discovers his true priorities; it was worth it to me to spend $20 more than planned eating out.  Do I want to reduce Groceries by $20?  Or have $20 less toward my next vacation?  Or does any option of taking $20 from somewhere else hurt so much that next time, I just don't overspend Dining in the first place?

    Those little decisions are how my financial position is optimized to my true priorities, which may not have been the same as I thought they were when I budgeted last month.

    Reply Like 9
      • HappyDance
      • YNABing consistently since 2014
      • HappyDance
      • 7 mths ago
      • 4
      • Reported - view

      Have to agree 100% with @Patzer on this  one.  "Overspends don't exist in isolation."  I don't leave any category red. I either move the funds from another category or I don't spend. If I have -100 in one category and +100 in another, I know that I really have zero in both.  I'd rather see the zero in both. It keeps me from chronically overspending. It pulls me from the rosy future place where I always have all the funds I will ever need to do everything and it keeps me in the reality of here and now. I make better spending decisions as a result.

      I've been trying to explain this concept to my sister for two years.  She always sees categories as separate silos of money. If she overspends in clothing, it should only affect clothing next month, whereas in reality overspending in clothing this month should/does affect every other category.  She keeps dipping into next month's money  (not yet received) this month with the justification that it's only $5, $10, $25 etc and she'll just spend less next month.  True, sometimes she does spend less in that category, but there always seems to be a category that is being overspent and that she leaves red to repay in the next month, and then she overdrafts her chequing account.  Every month.

      Reply Like 4
    •    yes in general I agree with you. But in this case I'm talking like .60 is all that was left in one category and the overspending was $117 that I knew I was just going to cover with my next paycheck. I already budgeted it out of the next paycheck. But the only way to make unable accept that is if I change the date on the transaction. In general I do not overspend, or if i do, I move money from the existing month. But what of the case when I do not have enough in any category to cover it. I know I know, don't spend it. But there aRe rare instances that it has to happen I just wish ynab could handle it better. 

      Reply Like
      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 7 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Gray Drum (1d39fb44f280) How can YNAB handle it better? As Patzer said, the money has to come from somewhere. You can't spend money you don't have.

      Well, you can, but that either results in overdraft or credit card debt. But YNAB can't stop you from spending money you don't have. Only you can do that.

      YNAB is just a tool to help guide your decision making, and like any tool, it can only do what it is capable of. So if you have to spend it, then you have to make adjustments to your budget so that you don't fall behind. YNAB's "automatic" month rollover functionality should be seen as the last resort for dealing with it.

      Your categories do not exist in isolation. Overspending in a category means your other categories don't have the amount of money in them that you think they do.

      What would you have done if your next paycheck didn't arrive as expected? Payroll glitches can and do happen. If you've not experienced that, then it's only because you haven't experienced it yet.

      Rather than wanting to adjust the way YNAB works, you should adjust your thinking to incorporate the limitations that YNAB imposes on your budget and understand what they mean.

      Reply Like 2
    • nolesrule  you guys are implying that I don't know what I am doing. I am actually very strict on my budget and fully acknowledge that the money has to come from somewhere. In the event something happened with my paycheck as expected, then I would have covered it with savings or even my emergency fund.  My complaint with ynab is if it rolls over a positive amount, why can't it roll over a small negative amount. Because payday happened to fall on the 1st it threw alot of things off. Most pay cycles don't fit within a specific month, and it alot easier to allocate a paycheck then it is to try and guess where the paychecks fall within the month. 

      Reply Like
      • nolesrule
      • YNAB4 Evangelist
      • nolesrule
      • 7 mths ago
      • 3
      • Reported - view

      Gray Drum (1d39fb44f280) If you understood, then you would know why it's not possible. The very first rule of the YNAB budgeting method is to Give Every Dollar a Job. That means not giving multiple jobs to your dollars, but the moment you have any overspent categories, that's exactly what you've done.

      If YNAB allows you to carry over the overspending in a category from month to month, then that also means you can leave that overspending in the category from month to month until the end of time, and that is doing you no favors.

      Furthermore, YNAB is an allocation budget system that is based on the principle of envelope budgeting. Each category represents an envelope. When using your envelopes, you can only spend the money that's in the envelope. You can't just spend more money you have in the envelope and drop in an IOU, which is what you are suggesting. The money has to come from somewhere.

      Yes, it can be annoying to have to cover an overspend for a few days from another category and then replenish the robbed category once you get more income, but that's part of how YNAB is supposed to work for you.

      Reply Like 3
      • HappyDance
      • YNABing consistently since 2014
      • HappyDance
      • 7 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Gray Drum (1d39fb44f280) 

      I think you are focused on not exceeding a monthly value ever, and by carrying negatives and postiives forward, you will eventually only spend a particular average amount. I can understand that because I am wired the same way.  I initially embraced the YNAB approach rather reluctantly (um...kicking and screaming comes to mind) because I was convinced that too much category flexibility would lead to excessive spending in all my categories all the time, and chaos would ensue. However, I actually found the reverse to be true.  The elasticity of the categories -- where I could move the dollar from one category to the other to avoid negatives -- worked to keep me under the monthly sum of all categories.  My category averages at the end of 12 months came in under the amount I wanted to hold myself to in the beginning even without holding my budgeted amounts to the average.  So, I have learned to trust myself and the Whac-A-Mole approach to dealing with the fact that my spending does not come in exactly equal to the average I want so spend each month. 

      Now, I also keep a super tight budget and often skim categories at the end of the month. This means my numbers are a little too rigid to allow much flexibility.  My solution was to create a small slush fund of between $50 and $100 that I can use to top up where/when needed.  I budget in whole numbers, a multiple of at least $5 with no cents.  On the last day of the month, just as I'm about to leave the month behind, I skim the categories so that the amount rolling over is a multiple of $5 with no cents.

      Reply Like 2
  • Hi Gray Drum (1d39fb44f280) !

    This is mentioned in the comments above, but we removed the ability to carry over negative amounts in the new YNAB. This was possible in YNAB 4, but it allowed your budget to be dishonest. If you have -$50 in a category, that means there isn't $50 in one of your other categories - even if just briefly at the turn of the month.

    Negative available balances are subtracted from your To Be Budgeted, so those negatives are accounted for in the new month - you don't have to budget more towards those categories to make up for the negatives. Instead, your To Be Budgeted will be lower by the negative amounts, as long as it was cash overspending (credit overspending won't be subtracted from your To Be Budgeted).

    We also have an article about when the month rolls over, so check it out and let me know if you have any other questions! :)

    Reply Like 1
      • Mr Crispy
      • Cyan_Lobster.3
      • 7 mths ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Faness Hello!  I have been a user of YNAB4 since Feb 2008.  I decided to take the plunge and change to the web version late last year, and for pretty much this sole reason (negative figure rollovers) I have been frustrated with it ever since.  There are LOTS of people discussing this both in and out of the forum, and surly there is actually a simple fix... Why not put a switch in the settings area, that allows you to opt in to rolling over negative figures?  By default you could leave it off to comply with the rule, but the user (your customer) has the ability to switch it on if thats how they would like to manage their budget.  You then cater for everyone and perhaps we would see a lot less posts in the internet that focus on this particular issue in YNAB.

      After just over 10 years with YNAB, I have signed up to trial another budget app in the last two weeks to try them out.  It will cost more per month if I sign up after the trial, and while it doesnt have this facility right now, I can see that they have it high on their road map agenda to sort this soon.  From all the responses, it appears that you just will not entertain it.

      Give people a choice to switch it on or off, and let them decide after you have advised them of the consequences.  Your customer is then a happy bunny as the product they pay for is working as they want it, and the issue goes away.

      Reply Like 2
    • Mr Crispy Thank you for adding in that suggestion! Since launching the new YNAB, we've tried to steer away from toggling options for a number of reasons (both on the development side of things and for customer service purposes). We're looking at ways to improve, so that isn't to say there will never be any toggle features in YNAB, but there aren't any currently planned. 

      You can still send this idea (or any others!) over to our development team by filling out the Feature Request form. That goes straight to them so that they can get a better view of exactly what users would like to see going forward. :)

      Reply Like
    • Faness this is preventing me and several others I know that still use YNAB4 from switching over. Lots of features to love about new YNAB, but this just doesn't work for sophisticated budgeters. Yes I know that you can't "trust" an account balance when some budgets are negative, but we've managed to make it work happily for 5 years, and removing it now feels like putting kid gloves back on the product. Please help us pay you money!

      Reply Like 4
    • Violet Hammerhead I know this is a huge change, but it's better aligned with the Four Rules. I've seen some users create workarounds (manually re-entering the overspending amount in the new month) to create this affect, but handling Reimbursements as outlined in the Help Doc is what we suggest. 

      Reply Like
    • Faness I was googling looking for an answer to this specific issue, and just need to say: I recognize that it works with your Four Rules. I just, quite frankly, don't care. I need software that works for my family, and for the way my husband and I discuss and use money. 

      Or, as an example: I spend 100$ on medication, will get 80$ back from my health insurance company in 3 weeks (aka: next month, and before my credit card bill is due). I budget 20$, which is the amount I actually need to spend. YES, it's 'over budget', in a very technical way, except that the insurance company will pay me before I need to pay my credit card company, and I don't WANT to manually adjust the amount I intend to put into savings TWICE to reflect less savings the month before I get reimbursed and then more the month after. I know it's happening, I know why it's happening, it's a conscious decision, and it works EVERYWHERE except in your software. And sure, I can work around it... in a really annoying way. I don't want to have to work around it. I just want it to WORK. 

      Reply Like 2
    • Silver Hammerhead well said!

      Reply Like
    • Hi Silver Hammerhead !

      Since you're using a credit card, you could leave that category overspent and when you receive the reimbursement budget it directly towards your credit card category. That would prevent you from having to adjust the amounts in the previous month and cover the difference in the current month so that the amount for your full payment is available. Is the issue there that you don't want to see that overspending in the previous month?

      Reply Like
    • Faness my problem is two-fold:

      1) sometimes, my spouse and I agree on a budgeting "standard" (aka: spend less than this on average on clothing every month), and we need to see how much, on average, we've spent in the year. And sometimes we say, for example, "the kids need boots now and not in 3 days when the month rolls over" and we're 20$ short in this technical month but it is what it is. We want our average to be maintained, we want to spend 20$ less in the following month to make up that difference, and we don't want to put less in savings this month/more next month/adjust 3 different categories to track that. It's a huge hassle to adjust what is, in real life, a common understanding of money. (And in practice? We just adjust the budget upwards this month, downwards next month, and stop trusting the 'available to budget' amount at all because because that's what gets us what we need as a couple. Your solution just forces a built-in lack of trust for your system numbers). 

      2) I need to know, yearly, what I spend on things like healthcare (specifically: its tax-deductible over a certain amount, and I dont want to calculate receipts for 4 hours to figure out if I qualify). The final number that I have actually spent, post-reimbursement, is what matters. I need the positives and negatives to roll along the year to give me a total I can use.

       

      What I'm hearing is that your development team is not intending to change this, because you want to force people to use your "way" of talking about money, and that I'd be better off coding my own thing/trying to adapt Mint?

      Reply Like
      • HappyDance
      • YNABing consistently since 2014
      • HappyDance
      • 2 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Silver Hammerhead 

      I definitely understand what you're saying.  But if you budget $20 more this month and $20 less next month, and spend $20 more than average this month and $20 less than average next month, you do end up with an annualized average that falls neatly into what you wanted to stick with monthly to begin with.  I rely on average spent and don't even look at average budgeted.

      This is the beautiful math of averaging.  The rolling with the punches flexibility of adjusting on the fly feels a little uninhibited, but you soon discover that you must take that extra $20 from somewhere else, and that is what is holding the numbers together.

      Before YNAB, I could easily overspend all my categories by $5-$20 with the plan to reduce the amount spent in the next month, and that resulted in a few really close calls on my account. After implementing the YNAB methodology and seeing how my spending fit in with all my other monthly spending versus by category only over many months, I began to exceed my savings targets every month. I wouldn't want to go back to the old way now.

      Reply Like 1
    • Silver Hammerhead 

      When reading your first point, this is what I understand that you mean:

      Every month, your agreed upon amount (which equals a value less than or equal to the average you want to spend annually) is budgeted into the category.  Then you spend as you need to.  And occasionally, like when you need kid boots, you need to intentionally overspend that category, leaving it red (i.e. Overspent) by $20.  The following month, you want to be able to budget the same agreed upon amount, but have the category reflect that there is actually $20 less there than there would be if you had not intentionally overspent the previous month.  The end result being that when you look at the annual spending at the end of the year, your average is maintained.

      What I understand that you would like from the software is for that carryover to remain so that you don't have to change how much you budget or transfer money from "saving" to "clothing" this month just to have to move it back from "clothing" to "saving" next month.  

      I imagine that your budget is relatively well funded - that you're not in a place where any overbudget category could mean you miss the rent payment or have to eat ketchup soup - and that is masking what the underlying misunderstanding is.  Consider for a moment what an overbudget category really means: It means that you have given the same dollars (say the $20 you reference above) two jobs at the same time.  The first job you assigned explicitly: put this $20 (maybe as part of a larger sum) into savings.  And the second job was given implicitly: We only have $40 for boots, but they cost $60 and we need them.  So the money has been spent, and now reflects that the $20 MUST be covered from somewhere else.

      So then you're faced with two choices:
      A.) Apply Rule 3 yourself and move the money from savings to clothing, zeroing out the category but saving less this month than you planned.  Next month, you can then make the concious decision to spend less on clothing, leaving $20 for you to move to savings (again, Rule 3).  Or, it could be that next month the kids need snowpants (I have twins who seem to grind snowpants into dust each year), and you spend the full budget again, and so on.  Either way, that you spent the money right now has been accounted for, and your balances are honest.  Each dollar has exactly one job.

      If this was a cash-based envelope budgeting system, with no credit, and you wanted to buy $60 of boots but you only have $40 in your "clothing" envelope, then you have to get that extra $20 from a different envelope, or no boots for you.

      Or,

      B.) Allow YNAB to apply Rule 3 for you.  This happens as the months roll over as a backstop.  Your dollars which are doing double-duty are all assigned to 1 job (the place where they were explicitly budgeted by you) and the remaning jobs (the overspending) are assigned first-crack at any new dollars that come in (by reducing TBB or making it negative).

      If we're back to the cash-based envelope budgeting system, this is like giving yourself a loan from tomorrow's paycheck - riding the float - and when you go to put funds in the envelopes because you've been paid, past you is standing in line first to require you to pay back that loan.

      The second point - healthcare - is actually a bit different.  I understand from your post that you'd like your total spending in that category to reflect negative (spends) and positive (reimbursements).  I have much the same requirement, and what I do is to categorize the deposits from insurance or FSA reimbursement as "Medical", just like I would the spending (instead of marking it as To Be Budgeted).  That way, the net difference in the category (what I have to add from my To Be Budgeted) at the end of the year reflects my total out-of-pocket health-care spending for the year.  I do the same thing for fees (my bank reimburses ATM Fees) and for a few other categories where I want to make sure that what I am spending is balanced exactly by reimbursements. (e.g. Work Travel).

      And so I don't think the problem overall is that the software doesn't line up with any particular general real-life understanding about how money works.  I think it is more that the priority that you have (I don't want to adjust the amounts I budget into my categories) is different than the priority of YNAB (Give each dollar one AND ONLY ONE job).  

      And that's ok, but it will mean that you either have some hassle, or you end up making your own system in a spreadsheet.  It's up to you to decide if the hassle / priority difference is greater than the amount of hassle involved with developing your own software.

      Reply Like 1
    • Horatio Spifflewicket You totally have a point about the well-funded budget - honestly, my concern is mostly to stop us from spending out of hand on stuff we like (books for me, music gear for my partner, groceries...) and maintain our general goals. If we're in a state where we need to raise the clothing budget to cover snowsuits one month, we will, but... yeah. I didn't want the hassle. 

       

      Question re: the medical spending. I see what you're saying about the positives and negatives 'balancing' but (realy-life issue) that means that my October budget is still showing as in the red, whereas my November budget (when the refund comes in) will look super overloaded. How do you manage that? (I'm thinking... either fudge the date of the refund, or decrease the November budget by the refund amount so it balances yearly...?)

      Reply Like
    • Silver Hammerhead 
       

      One thing it is important to remember is that the value in the budget category is not the spending.  So I tend not to look at a category as being "overly full" in any way, although I do go through occasionally and see if the little bits of change that are collecting are still in line with my priorities.  I'm very conservative about things that are necessary (like medical) so any budgeted-but-unspent funds there typically are invited to stay in case of an emergency :)

      I do have a method that I like to apply when a category that would fall under immediate obligations (mortgage, utilities, food, etc.) or true expenses (medical, maintenence, clothing, etc.) goes red. First I try to decide if the expense that sent me overbudget was a "regular" (i.e. just sort of normal) expense or an "act-of-god" type expense (tree falls down in yard, kiddo needs emergency medical care, etc.).

      If it is a regular expense, then I have to decide if it's worth making a change to how we allocate funds to accomodate (less $ for date night, more for medical) or if I should try to eliminate the expense.

      If it is an act-of-god, then I do a couple of things (we'll assume medical for this discussion), in this order
      1.) Take some dollars from the emergency fund category and give them the job of moving over to medical to cover the expense.
      2.) Adjust the target-balance goal for the category so that the expense wouldn't have put me overbudget + an additional 10%.  This is in part because I don't want to have to worry later, and in part because I know that money just hanging out in a category is still earning me bank interest :)
      3.) Then, when the reimbursement comes in, I take a look at the status of the medical category against that new goal.  Is it at the goal threshold? If no, then I leave it alone and make smaller contributions to discretionary categories like dining out until the emergency fund is back at it's target balance.  If yes, it is at the goal, then I shift any additional funds back to replenish the emergency fund.  That way, in the future, the cash will be there ready if I have another strange expense. (If you are imagining that I have a relatively large amount sitting in medical, you are correct. I hate emergencies, but acknowledge I can't prevent them all.)

      And as long as the expenses are properly categorized and the reimbursements are also categorized as medical, when I look at the reporting at the end of the year, the net difference will still be my out of pocket expenses.

      This is not a state of affairs that came about easily, though.  There was a long period when first starting out that EVERY expense pulled categories into the red and would deplete my emergency fund (which was small).  So there were a lot of "we're having rice!" moments in the beginning.  It's payed out over time, though, and now it's really just a bunch of tiny tweaks.  

      My next goal is to start funding the future.  ("Stealing from the future" is another giant rabbit hole that people have strong opinions about.  My trick is to remember that money given jobs for next month is only my best estimate, and that I may have to pull some of it back to today if I have an emergency.  So it's not really "stealing" it's more "oops my plan was out of alignment with reality. Rule 3!")

      At the end of the day, though, I think it is up to everyone in their own unique situations to decide what to do when they find that they've accidentally given one dollar two jobs.  (And it does happen to everyone, all the time, because when we first give those To Be Budgeted dollars jobs we're just making educated guesses as to what the future will hold).

      Reply Like
  • TryingToGetAhead said:
    ... I will WAM to prevent...

     Water Anchor Mustache?

    Google was less helpful than I thought in trying to figure out the acronym :)

    Reply Like
      • WordTenor
      • Your lieutenant, when there's reckoning to be reckoned.
      • WordTenor
      • 7 mths ago
      • 1
      • Reported - view

      Horatio Spifflewicket Whac-A-Mole. Moving money from one category to another; like the arcade game, sometimes one Whac creates another. 

      Reply Like 1
  • Silver Hammerhead said:
    How do you manage that? (I'm thinking... either fudge the date of the refund, or decrease the November budget by the refund amount so it balances yearly...?)

    From what you wrote, I think that you are trying to make the amount budgeted every single month be the exact same number.  That will certainly force the annual amount (and monthly amounts) to be exactly what you want them to be, but it will be frustrating if you don't have a pad in the category to deal with spending that is sporadic and irregular.  You really will get the same annual total and annualized monthly average by budgeting $20 more this month because you need it and $20 less next month because you don't. After 12 months, the average budgeted and average spent will be what you intended to budget monthly, and without going through fudging or work-arounds.

    I find the average monthly spent  a really valuable metric.  It tells me when my costs are trending up.  If that happens in an essential category, say prescriptions, then I know I need to revise my monthly budgeted up.  If it starts trending up in a discretionary category, say entertainment, I need to review my spending and lifestyle expectations for either a budget change or a behaviour change.  If I artificially create workarounds so that the amount budgeted and spent are fudged to fit an arbitrary monthly number (while I owe a future category balance), then the reported average monthly spent becomes a useless number that gives me no guidance at all.

    Reply Like
  • I'm no expert and am still learning the basics of YNAB, but it seems to me that the simplest thing to do is to reduce the category budget next month by the amount overspent the month before. I'll give you an example. My wife and I get £150 each month to spend on ourselves. She spends £200 in November, so she has a -£50 'red' showing in the 'available' column. I reduce her December allowance by £50, which means she only gets £100 for December. If she continues to overspend, then her 'red' figure will continue to rise as the negative continues to be deducted from future months unless she puts some money in there from her personal account to cover it (or just doesn't spend in this category until it's back in credit). This also means that the £50 that she didn't receive in her budget for December goes elsewhere (if I have it available from my inflow) rather than supporting her overspending. BTW, she's not a serial overspender, but I'm just using her by way of example. That said, this is an area where we are both less careful than we ought to be at times, but after 34 years of marriage, we're both happy with how this works. Effectively, we're both borrowing on future budgets - not ideal but overall YNAB has taken us from a £2k overdraft to a £6k positive, so it works on balance bar these small inconsistencies in our financial rigour.  I am sure there are holes in this strategy and I'd be happy and grateful to have them pointed out. I guess we all make YNAB our own in different ways. That's one of the good things about the system. 

    Reply Like
  • Hi, I've just landed on YNAB.

    This happens in my case for recurring expenses that are not exactly the same each month. For instance for electricity budget I divide the estimated total between each month. For instance, 50€ each month. But it happens that one month it is 55 and next 40. So yearly budget is fulfilled but some months are red. May I correct this automatically?

    Reply Like
  • gmartin said:
    shouldn't I get money from next month in same category? 

     I'm not sure what that means. Yes, if you move money into a category and you don't spend it this month, you will have it there next month.

    You can't borrow against money you're going to receive next month but haven't received yet, if that's what you mean. You don't get to budget money you don't have yet. You can move money from another category this month to cover the electricity overspending and then add extra money back to that category next month if you so desire. But if you don't cover your overspending this month you can't trust your category balances, and you need to be able to do that to guide your spending decisions.

    Reply Like 1
  • It is the second case you've told. I have a clear view now. I cannot get money from future incomes. Goals are a great tool too. Thank you!!!

    Reply Like 2
  • I have a problem that I initially thought the OP was desribing, but apparently mine is different.  I just started with nYNAB; I had used YNAB3&4 for years, then fell out of budgeting for the last 6-8 months. I am in my first month and have a category that is overspent.  I plan to shift money in this months budget to cover, but havent done so yet. The overpsend us NOT reflected in the next month, either in the category, or in overspent from January, or in TBB.  The current month, January, is budgeted to zero, so I thought, maybe since next month (Feb) TBB is currently zero, that it wouldnt reflect last month's overspend properly becuase it was coded not to allo a negative TBB. To testthe theory, I unbudgetted money in January, so that there was both a positive caryover to Feb TBB and a January overspend that should be deducted from the Feb TBB. It didnt work. So, in summary, my January actegory overspend is not reflected in anyway in the Feb budget. If I budget Jan to 0 or if I purposely leave money to budget in Feb, the January overspend stays in January. Eitehr this is undamentally roken in the current release, in which I have ound a bug (please fix.) or I am missing something.  Like I said in the beginning, my intention is to "roll with the punches" and cover the January overspend from another January category, but nonetheless, I think the behavior is unexpected. Assuming no silver bullet is idenified by the users here, is there a way to open a ticket with YNAB?

    ~Jed

    Reply Like 1
      • jenmas
      • jenmas
      • 6 days ago
      • 2
      • Reported - view

      Coral Hail regardless of which transaction caused the category to be overspent, were any transactions this month in that category on a credit card? If so you will see that your credit card payment category doesn’t match your credit card balance and that is where the overspending is living. 

      Reply Like 2
    • Hi Jed! Coral Hail 

      What happens to overspending amounts depends on whether the overspending was with cash or credit.

      • If cash, that amount will be deducted from To be Budgeted in the new month.
      • If credit, the overspent amount will be represented as an increased balance on your credit card account.

      YNAB understands credit can be paid back overtime, so overspending on a credit card isn't subtracted from your To Be Budgeted in the next month - that cash isn't gone until you pay the credit card bill. Whereas, with cash, the money has already left your account.

      PS. Just for future reference, you can submit a Bug Report to have our development team investigate technical issues. :)

      Reply Like
      • Coral Hail
      • Coral_Hail.1
      • 6 days ago
      • Reported - view

      Faness OK, found it.  Thank you and jenmas . Yes, basically all spending is on a credit card, including this expense. Seems a little cryptic if I have to looking for it.  All of my cards are PIF and I set a goal  budgetting for the PIF balance and the only clue was that the goal went orange with the overspend. For PIF card users, I expect most of us have PIF on auto-draft and will PIF regardless of how we budgeted. It might be nice to allow for a PIF goal that dynamcly adjusts with spending vs beng tied to a static amount defined before spending. Not holding my breath given the lack of attention given to the far more important "income for next month" feature that was taken from us.

       

      ~Jed

      Reply Like
    • Hi Jed! Coral Hail 

      I'm glad you were able to find that! Would you mind sending over your suggestion for that PIF goal (or others) as a Feature Request

      Our Design Team collects the information—every last bit of it—in a database. Just about every day, they go through all of it and code it, and analyze all this collected feedback to plan for what’s next  in YNAB!

      Let us know if you have any other questions!

      Reply Like
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